doggerel


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doggerel

, dogrel
a. comic verse, usually irregular in measure
b. (as modifier): a doggerel rhythm
References in classic literature ?
But then I couldn't, with any respect for her, tell her the trout's message, or, with any respect for myself, recall those atrocious doggerel lines.
During the execution of this sonorous doggerel, Richard kept time with his whip on the mane of his charger, accompanying the gestures with a corresponding movement of his head and body.
I found besides a large account-book, which, when opened, hopefully turned out to my infinite consternation to be filled with verses--page after page of rhymed doggerel of a jovial and im proper character, written in the neatest minute hand I ever did see.
As in previous installments of this poem series, the start-and end-words are here presented in the stanzas of a painfully purple doggerel on an irrelevant subject: this year, on how wonderful in every way it is to be a bird (article submission fee provided by the Board to Immediately Reduce Deforestation and Sheetglass).
Within weeks, a long doggerel poem was in circulation all over the North.
Known universally for his Life of Samuel Johnson, James Boswell was a rollicking writer of essays, letters, and doggerel, as well as newspaper and journal articles.
Caplan analyzes the somewhat insolent verse and declares it to be doggerel, which he explains is often used as a "pejorative, referring to bad or inept poetry" (32).
It was a triumph of mind over matter, and as he explains in an earlier book on his crossing of Antarctica, a favourite doggerel is 'Always a little further, Pilgrim, I will go.
Now three or four decades have passed Of sending doggerel to space, This very night at 8pm You will be here in my birthplace
The title also includes coloured photographs of Caldwell's canine companions, along with a section of poetic Doggerel.
I also lost patience with the writers' insistence on telling the story in verse, leading to doggerel like ''Now be strong, get ready for battle/I will free you from your shackle.
James McLennan's Triquet, the effete esthete who entertains the guests with a hammy recitation of his doggerel in Act II, was an audience hit and certainly provided the comic relief the opera prescribes at that point in its downhill slide towards death and despair.