dogwood


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Related to dogwood: Dogwood Festival, Kousa Dogwood

dogwood

or

cornel

(kôr`nəl), shrub or tree of the genus Cornus, chiefly of north temperate and tropical mountain regions, characteristically having an inconspicuous flower surrounded by large, showy bracts which are often mistaken for petals. This trait is evident in the flowering dogwood (C. florida) of E North America, with white or pink bracts, and the very similar Pacific dogwood (C. nuttallii) of the West. Dogwood anthracnose, a fungal disease, has killed many wild woodland dogwoods since the 1980s. Both species are cultivated as ornamentals. Their bark, rich in tannin, has been used medicinally (as is that of the other species of Cornus), for example, as a quininequinine
, white crystalline alkaloid with a bitter taste. Before the development of more effective synthetic drugs such as quinacrine, chloroquine, and primaquine, quinine was the specific agent in the treatment of malaria.
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 substitute. Their hard wood is used for various objects, e.g., machinery bearings and tool handles. The fruits of some species are edible, e.g., those of the Old World cornelian cherry (C. mas), used also for preserves and the French liqueur vin de cornouille. The bunchberry, or dwarf cornel (C. canadensis), is a low herbaceous wildflower of North America. Dogwoods are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Cornales, family Cornaceae.
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dogwood

dogwood

Most dogwood fruits are super bitter and not edible, but one palatable species is called Cornelian Cherry (available from EdibleLandscaping.com). The root-bark tea from normal Dogwoods used historically as an astringent (stops bleeding), pain-reducing anti-inflammatory, laxative, cough suppressant for malaria, fever, uterine problems and diarrhea. Twigs are chewed to clean and whiten teeth.

Dogwood

 

shrubs and trees of several species. Swida sanguinea is usually called dogwood; it is widespread in western and central regions of the European USSR and in middle and southern Europe; more rarely, S. australis, which grows in the Crimea, the Caucasus, and Asia Minor, is called dogwood. They are shrubs or low trees of the family Cornaceae, having purple shoots, white flowers and corymbiform inflorescences without spathes, and opposite, simple leaves, pale-green underneath. The fruits are juicy and spherical, blue-black or black. Both species are widely grown as ornamentals. Sometimes the wild service tree is called dogwood.


Dogwood

 

(Cornus), a genus of trees and shrubs of the family Cornaceae. The leaves are simple, entire, and opposite. The small bisexual flowers are gathered in umbellate clusters. The fruits are fleshy red drupes on stalks. Four species are found in central and southern Europe, Asia Minor, central China, Japan, and North America (California). The Soviet Union has one species, the cornelian cherry (Cornus mas). It grows in the underbrush and thickets at the edges of leafy forests in the southwestern European USSR, the Crimea, and the Caucasus. Its fruits are eaten fresh and used in preserves and compotes. The hard heavy wood is used in the manufacture of various items. Dogwood trees contain tannins, and are nectar-bearing.

dogwood

of North Carolina and Virginia. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 639]
References in periodicals archive ?
Christopher Merrill has declared this faith in surrounding his home with beautiful flowering dogwood trees; in Self-Portrait with Dogwood, he plants them also in our hearts.
Other finishes, available in several combinations on select pieces, include Cobblestone, a soft gray paint inspired by French pieces found in Savannah's famed antiques district; Blossom, a chalk white with timeworn rub-through named for the dogwood bloom; and Driftwood, a gray stain, used on tabletops only, which has the casual feel of Low Country Spanish moss.
Kara Bonzheim, CAS, joined Dogwood as the Regional Sales Representative for the eastern United States.
There are many things to consider, including temperature range and insect pests to which particular dogwood candidates may be susceptible," says Olsen.
Pruning the dogwoods in early spring gives the shrub plenty of time to generate masses of long straight, cane-like stems through the summer growing season which will develop the stunning colour effect the following winter months.
1st Source has been pleased to be part of the Dogwood Estates redevelopment,' said Julie Keb, Manager of the 1st Source Banking Center in Walkerton.
The dogwood trees will be presented to Japan from the United States as the two nations mark the 100th anniversary of the gift to Washington of 3,000 cherry trees by Tokyo in 1912, the two governments said Monday.
Campbell's favourite Dogwood colour bearers have included 1990 Preakness Stakes winner Summer Squall, who sired Dogwood's Breeders' Cup winner Storm Song, bought by Campbell for $100,000.
The dogwood is, of course, a Texas tree, and Bates elsewhere paints the magnolia, another southern flower.
Dogwood (Cornus) THESE deciduous shrubs are grown for their eyecatching stems, which provide useful colour in the winter garden, and some are particularly useful in smaller gardens.
Dogwood is a contemporary large-scale floral pattern that the company says will work well in any environment.
Cut stems of dogwood so that all stems are the same length and place at the back of the vase.