doister

doister

[′dȯis·tər]
(meteorology)
In Scotland, a severe storm from the sea. Also known as deaister; dyster.
References in classic literature ?
A play named Ralph Roister Doister is generally looked upon as the first real English comedy.
In revenge for her scorn Ralph Roister Doister threatens to burn the dame's house down, and sets off to attack it with his servants.
Shortly after the middle of the century, probably, the head-master of Westminister School, Nicholas Udall, took the further step of writing for his boys on the classical model an original farce-comedy, the amusing 'Ralph Roister Doister.
Ralph Roister Doister contains a much more elaborate scene in which the maidservants--Madge Mumblecrust, Tib Talkapace and Annot Alyface--sing while performing three different female occupations, sewing, spinning and knitting ("So shall we pleasantly bothe the tyme beguile now,/ And eke dispatche all our works ere we can tell how.
The players accepted it philosophically and took their wagons out into the country with a revival of Ralph Roister Doister.
One of the texts that Wilson quotes at length is a soliloquy by Madge Mumblecrust from Nicholas Udall's Ralph Roister Doister, who becomes the starting point for Mazzio's second chapter, "From Fault to Figure: The Case of Madge Mumblecrust in Ralph Roister Doister.
If there are historical reasons for this narrative privileging of the individual, it is also true that Elizabethan and Jacobean drama had its own eponymic repertoire (Ralph Roister Doister, Dr.
In 1966 a graduate seminar at the University of Toronto led to a production of the medieval play Rafe Roister Doister and eventually to the formation of the Poculi Ludique Societas, or the PLS, the oldest and most respected medieval drama society in North America.
1938 "Some earlier examples of the rhetorical device in Ralph Roister Doister (III.
Chapter 2, "From Fault to Figure," further explores the perils of English vernacularism, focusing in particular on Nicholas Udall's Ralph Roister Doister, a play originally composed in the early 1550s for Udall's grammar school students.
We would need to add the great lyric poets from Wyatt to Gascoigne, of course, and classics such as Gorboduc and Ralph Roister Doister still pass muster.
At the beginning, English stage comedy inclined toward the Terentian: it was Terence's braggart soldier, not Plautus's, who found his way into Udall's Ralph Roister Doister.