dolly


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Related to dolly: Dolly shop, Dolly Parton

dolly

1. Films Television a wheeled support on which a camera may be mounted
2. a cup-shaped anvil held against the head of a rivet while the other end is being hammered
3. a shaped block of lead used to hammer dents out of sheet metal
4. a distance piece placed between the head of a pile and the pile-driver to form an extension to the length of the pile
5. Cricket a simple catch

dolly

[′däl·ē]
(engineering)
Any of several types of industrial hand trucks consisting of a low platform or specially shaped carrier mounted on rollers or combinations of fixed and swivel casters; used to carry such things as furniture, milk cans, paper rolls, machinery weighing up to 80 tons, and television cameras short distances.

dolly

1. A block of hardwood placed on the upper end of a pile; acts as an extension piece and as a cushion during pile driving.
2. A tool for holding the head of a rivet and absorbing the impact while the other head is being driven.
3. A low cart or truck used for transporting heavy or bulky equipment.

dolly

i. Any of the several devices used in lifting or carrying heavy aircraft components.
ii. Airborne data-linked equipment.
References in classic literature ?
And he's got a voice like a bird--you wouldn't think," Dolly went on; "he can sing a Christmas carril as his father's taught him; and I take it for a token as he'll come to good, as he can learn the good tunes so quick.
The Christmas carol, with its hammer-like rhythm, had fallen on his ears as strange music, quite unlike a hymn, and could have none of the effect Dolly contemplated.
Oh, no, thank you, Master Marner," said Dolly, holding down Aaron's willing hands.
Silas said "Good-bye, and thank you kindly," as he opened the door for Dolly, but he couldn't help feeling relieved when she was gone-- relieved that he might weave again and moan at his ease.
Dolly looked silly, and had one of those triangular faces that so often prove attractive to a robust man.
Dolly, upreared, with distended nostrils and wild eyes, was pawing the air madly with her fore legs.
Why, Dolly, this is most remarkable," Lute began reprovingly.
Again and again, half a dozen times, Dolly arched herself into the air and struck, stiffly bunched.
Dolly straightened out so that the line of the face was almost a continuation of the line of the stretched neck; this position enabled her to master the bit, which she did by bolting straight ahead down the road.
But he had no opportunity to say anything in his own defence, for at that moment Dolly herself appeared, and struck him quite dumb with her beauty.
Miggs was hovering about too; and the fact of her existence, the mere circumstance of her ever having been born, appeared, after Dolly, such an unaccountable practical joke.
This was the end of all his bold determination, resolved upon for the hundredth time, to speak out to Dolly and tell her how he loved her