dolmen


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dolmen

(dŏl`mĕn, dōl–) [Breton,=stone table], burial chamber consisting of two or more upright stone slabs supporting a capstone or table, typical of the Neolithic period in Europe. See megalithic monumentsmegalithic monument
[Gr.,=large stone], in archaeology, a construction involving one or several roughly hewn stone slabs of great size; it is usually of prehistoric antiquity.
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Dolmen

Several large stones capped with a covering slab, as those erected in prehistoric times.

Dolmen

 

an ancient burial structure, one of the types of megalithic structures. Dolmens were built from huge stone slabs weighing tens of thousands of kilograms placed vertically and supporting one or several flat slabs. They were one of the first examples of integral architectural composition based on the laws of architectonics. Dolmens usually contained the remains of several dead with stone or bronze weapons and ornaments. Some dolmens were used for burials over a few decades or even centuries. It is assumed that they were originally constructed for the burial of tribal elders. According to another hypothesis, they initially served as tribal sanctuaries and only later were converted into burial places. Dolmens are widespread in the coastal regions of Europe, North Africa, and Asia. In the USSR they are found along the Black Sea coast of the Caucasus and in the Crimea. In Europe and North Africa dolmens date from the Bronze Age; in India and Japan, from the Iron Age; and in the Caucasus, from the Early and Middle Bronze Age (the second and third millennia B.C.), with some built as late as the first millennium B.C.

REFERENCES

Kuftin, B. A. MaterialykarkheologiiKolkhidy, vol. 1. Tbilisi, 1949. Lavrov, L. I. “Dol’meny severo-zapadnogo Kavkaza.” In Tr. Aokhazkogo instituta iazyka, literatury i istorii, vol. 31. Sukhumi, 1960.
Childe, V. G. U istokov evropeiskoi tsivilizatsii. Moscow, 1952. (Translated from English.)
Vseobshchaia istoriia arkhitektury, vol. 1. Moscow, 1944. Pages 24-25.

A. L. MONGAIT

dolmen, table stone

A prehistoric tomb of standing stones, usually capped with a large horizontal slab.

dolmen

1. (in British archaeology) a Neolithic stone formation, consisting of a horizontal stone supported by several vertical stones, and thought to be a tomb
2. (in French archaeology) any megalithic tomb
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Thomas Kinsella was not as closely connected to Dolmen's Poetry Ireland as to The Dolmen Miscellany of 1961 and to The Dolmen Chapbook, which Miller saw as a way to fit 'individual type and illustration' to poetic text.
The Dolmen Press printing fee was quite expensive for that time, itself nearly 100 [pounds sterling] per issue.
The burials have been classified in a variety of forms: cairn circle, dolmen, cist burial, urn burials, sarcophagi and combinations of these (Krishnaswami 1949; Gururaja Rao 1972; Leshnik 1972; Rajan 2000).
uest at the event rang the Gong and said, "The launch of Dolmen City REIT is a matter of great pride for all of us, as this is not just Pakistans first REIT scheme but also the Subcontinents.
The horizontal series of zig-zags on the Portela do Pau dolmen in northern Portugal (Baptista 1997) provide another example of its use.
More importantly, the architecture of Perthi Duon appears to be a blueprint with other Portal Dolmen monuments within what is termed the Irish Province.
This pattern may be because the survival of lotic populations is lower (Korkeamaki and Suhonen, 2002), perhaps due to degradation of some lotic habitats (Olsvik and Dolmen 1992).
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The third traces the stories of eight enterprises engaged in Irish publishing: the British duo of Macmillan and Faber, and the specialized Irish houses of Gill, Cuala, Maunsel, Dolmen, Gallery, and Blackstaff.
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