domestic

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domestic

Informal (esp in police use) an incident of violence in the home, esp between a man and a woman
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Indian media, Kuwait is the only Gulf country that has failed to accept a condition set by the Indian government requesting foreign employers to pay $2,500 (Dh9,182) as bank guarantee to hire Indian domestic workers.
This means that the domestic workers must become "second mothers and housewives.
A random check of some of the manpower agencies in the Capital showed that promotion and recruitment of Indonesian domestic workers is still very much active with some even advertising them on their website.
However, the incident also highlights the mindset and treatment of domestic workers in India and abroad.
More than 25 countries have improved legal protections for domestic workers, with many of the strongest reforms in Latin America.
At the personal level, there are various reasons why migrant domestic workers choose not to utilise medical or health care services.
She said that there are around 30,000 domestic workers in Cyprus, mostly women, with very low salaries of e1/4314 per month, set by law.
CRCHE facilities should be provided for all working women to reduce dependence on domestic workers, according to a major trade union body.
Bahrain has introduced new rules allowing expatriates in the kingdom to legally employ domestic workers in a move to end the housemaid visa black market, a report said.
RyYAD (CyHAN)- Saudi Labor Ministry has announced a plan to expand the country's hiring source of domestic workers to 9 new countries to meet the demand, Al Hayat newspaper reported Monday.
They said domestic workers from other countries are subjected to health examination before and after recruitment in order to check if they are medically fit for the work, the report states.
TEHRAN (FNA)- An international human rights group slammed Qatar for failing to protect foreign maids and other domestic workers from exploitation, adding pressure on the Persian Gulf state over its labor practices as it gears up to host the 2022 World Cup.