domestication

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domestication

[də‚mes·tə′kā·shən]
(biology)
The adaptation of an animal or plant through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with and advantageous to humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Barley stalks are used as thatch on roofs and are also collected as fodder for domesticated animals.
mineral and organic substances) of milk produced by lactating, domesticated female moose on a Pechora-Ilych reservation farm.
trade or business to carry over to a domesticated corporation, the proposed regulation obviates the need for a U.
Research is now focussed on improving the average reproductive output of the giant tiger prawn, improving the capacity for the farms to stock ponds with progeny from domesticated broodstock, and developing and introducing selective breeding for commercially useful traits.
Eurasia won because its supply of wild plants, which provided the gene pool for domesticated crops, was larger, richer, and better.
Five animals stand out as the most universally used: the horse, which was first domesticated on the northern shores of the Black Sea, and sheep, goats, pigs and cattle, all domesticated in SW Asia.
Except for the macadamia nut, which is hardly a major crop in Australia or the world, no Australian species have been domesticated.
Images of animals were meant to ensure success in the hunt and in the raising of domesticated animals.
The initial absence of domesticated animals from their households explains in part why they appeared to require instruction, but the main problem lay in the fact that their farmers were so often female.
Scarlett's Magic is an F1 Savannah Cat, a unique, intelligent and loving domesticated cat with the look of a wild plains hunter and the docile nature of a family's most loyal pet.
Domesticated animals tend to have genetic variants that affect similar biological processes, such as brain and facial development and fur coloration.
According to the New York Times, many biblical stories involving camels took place long before the animals were actually domesticated - Tel Aviv University researchers used radiocarbon dating to find out that the earliest known camels to be domesticated in Israel lived decades, and in some cases centuries, after they had been featured in biblical tales, the Verge reported.