domestication


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domestication

[də‚mes·tə′kā·shən]
(biology)
The adaptation of an animal or plant through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with and advantageous to humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results from this study will contribute to an international effort using a variety of genetic techniques to analyze ancient dogs and wolves to better understand the origins of canine domestication.
Of these zones, only the Central Zagros is considered "formative", defined as the locus of the earliest evidence of domestication and sedentism without obvious external influence of any significance; others are considered as "learning zones" (p.
Wayne said further research is needed to confirm their findings: "This is not the end-story in the debate about dog domestication, but I think it is a powerful argument opposing other hypotheses of origin.
The final mode of species domestication is entrusted to technology in Butler's posthumanism, but a technology that draws upon the virtues of a historically subordinated race: the Africans.
See Paula Baker, "The Domestication of Politics: Women and American Political Society, 1780-1920," American Historical Review 89 (June 1984): 620-47.
Several problems concerning the domestication of the dog have challenged anthropologists for decades.
The first step in domestication could have happened without any planning at all.
When this happens, domestication of the foreign corporation is an attractive alternative.
On the production front, CSIRO Marine Research, the Australian Institute of Marine Science and various industry partners have developed domestication strategies for farmed prawn species which reduce reliance on the diminishing wild prawn stocks and give farmers greater control over when they stock.
The Mediterranean originated the kind of domus culture described by Ian Hodder in The Domestication of Europe (1990).
Plant domestication and natural evolution show similarities as well as differences (van Raamsdonk, 1993).
In July, three scientists proposed that certain physical features shared by domestic animals, described as domestication syndrome, might all result from mild defects in the function of cells known as neural crest cells (SN: 8/23/14, p.