domestication


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domestication

[də‚mes·tə′kā·shən]
(biology)
The adaptation of an animal or plant through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with and advantageous to humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ultimately, four independent domestication events may have occurred in this genus.
One limitation of the study is its lack of ancient DNA analysis, leading some dog domestication researchers to question the results.
This haplogroup was regarded as a relatively ancient population expansion which has corresponded to the first domestication event of goats in nearly 10000 years ago (Luikart et al.
We took only a bit of the diversity from the wild for domestication, and what we're looking at now is lopping it off really fast so we'll be left with little diversity to survive all the climate and disease issues we're facing.
This in turn indicates that the domestication of dogs may be connected to the human development of agriculture, and that it was on the scrap heaps of early settlements that the first steps of the development of dogs took place.
This chapter focuses on the genetic stocks including mutants, selections, transgenic and interspecific types that are critical for lupin domestication and improvement.
So the researchers were surprised that they could find genetic signatures of domestication in the animals at all.
The question, Olsen said, is whether crops reverted to wild forms by reversing the genetic changes that resulted in their domestication or through mutations that circumvented domestication in other ways.
had an epiphany at a bull fight: he was watching a ritual portrayal of the domestication of civilization's most prized food source.
With Duchampian verve, McBride strips bare modernism's "bachelor"-hood, even, revealing its complicity with the spatial isolation, regimentation, and domestication of the body--particularly the female body.
ISBN 0-521-40112-7) in 1995, describes what is known about the origins of agriculture and the domestication of the crop plants that sustain us.
Shipman presents readers with an investigation of the extinction of Neanderthals as a species, arguing that the early domestication of wolf-dogs by modern human migrants to Europe provided the species with a distinct advantage in hunting large Ice Age mammals in a time when climate change made Neanderthals especially vulnerable.