Donor

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donor

1. Med any person who voluntarily gives blood, skin, a kidney etc., for use in the treatment of another person
2. Law
a. a person who makes a gift of property
b. a person who bestows upon another a power of appointment over property
3. Chemistry the atom supplying both electrons in a coordinate bond
4. Physics an impurity, such as antimony or arsenic, that is added to a semiconductor material in order to increase its n-type conductivity by contributing free electrons

Donor

 

in medieval and Renaissance art and sometimes in the art of later periods, a representation of the builder of the church holding a model of the structure in his hands or of the patron who had ordered the painting, more rarely, sculpture or work of decorative applied art. The donor usually stands before Christ and the Virgin Mary or the saints.


Donor

 

a person giving his own blood for transfusion, or tissue (for example, skin) or an organ (for example, a kidney) for transplantation in a patient (the recipient). At the present stage of science the most widely found form of donation is blood donation. In the USSR donation is a voluntary act. Any healthy (according to a special medical examination), physically mature person 18 years of age and older can become a donor. The giving of blood is harmless for the donor. The health of the donor is protected, and in the USSR the donors have benefits. They are permitted to leave work with pay in order to give blood, and after giving blood they receive a day off with pay from the institution where they are employed. Donors are the first to receive permits to stay at sanatoriums and rest homes. The Executive Committee of the Red Cross and Red Crescent has established an award for donors, the badge Honorary Donor of the USSR.

donor

[′dō·nər]
(solid-state physics)
An impurity that is added to a pure semiconductor material to increase the number of free electrons. Also known as donor impurity; electron donor.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Model of Personal Donorship (Mount, 1996) suggests that the level of involvement of a donor is an important predictor of the giving behavior of that donor and that involvement is the result of expected satisfaction.
The participants in the International Meeting on Good Humanitarian Donorship committed themselves to allocating humanitarian funding in proportion to needs and to exploring the possibility of reducing earmarking and introducing longer-term funding arrangements.
This is the part my wife prefers that I not write about--not the quirky, clutching mysticism but the enormously complicated choice of egg donorship, which neither of us had ever suspected would elicit such callous response from our closest friends.
Zoe Pickering and Craig Williams, parents of heart transplant baby Roman Williams, are backing the Mirror's campaign to change the law on organ donorship to an opt-out system.
Of course, compulsory donorship must become law - an extension of road tax, if you like.
Advocacy NGOs seek protection and sustainment of human rights through political initiatives, international and national agreements and policies, donorship, and solution building.
Investigating the impact of foreign donorship on the development of civil society non-governmental organizations in Russia, Sundstrom (political science, U.
This bias towards complex emergencies is clearly observed by the Humanitarian Policy Group research report on donorship trends, which notes that, "as a comparison of overall humanitarian aid on the FTS [Financial Tracking Service] from 1999-2004, only 8 percent has been for natural disasters.
Thus was born the Good Humanitarian Donorship Initiative, which seeks to hold donors such as OFDA more accountable to all of their stakeholders--affected populations, taxpayers, and other donors--for their policies and decisions.
And it may have damaged the cause of organ donorship.
With the continued growth in the use technology, the UWCM eMall is a creative and convenient way to increase donorship by capitalizing on an online user's existing shopping habits.
Zoe Pickering and Craig Williams, parents of hearttransplant baby Roman Williams, are backing the Mirror's campaign to change the law on organ donorship to an opt-out system.