dopamine hypothesis


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dopamine hypothesis

[′dōp·ə‚mēn hī‚päth·ə·səs]
(medicine)
A theory that explains the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and other psychotic states as due to excesses in dopamine activity in various brain areas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Compared to the previous versions of the dopamine hypothesis, the sociodevelopmental-cognitive model suggests that dopamine dysfunction accounts not only for delusions but also for hallucinations and negative symptoms, such as apathy and a motivation.
The neuropsychopharmacology of phencyclidine: from NMDA receptor hypofunction to the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia.
As a cause of schizophrenia, 3 hypotheses are advocated: dopamine hypothesis, glutamate hypothesis, and neurodevelopmental disorder hypothesis.
While a variety of hypotheses offer potential explanations, most individuals today accept the theory of psychosis known as the dopamine hypothesis (Howes & Kapur, 2009).
Neuropharmacology of second-generation antipsychotic drugs: a validity of the serotonin - dopamine hypothesis.
Etiologic subtypes of attentiondeficit/ hyperactivity disorder: brain imaging, molecular genetic and environmental factors and the dopamine hypothesis.
The purpose of the present study was to investigate this dopamine hypothesis by observing the effects of a dopamine agonist on indices of motor performance and reinforcement efficacy derived from a matching law analysis of the relationship between response and reinforcement rates in a context where responding was reinforced by the opportunity to run.
The dopamine hypothesis of reward: past and current status.
Unlike the dopamine hypothesis, the adrenochrome hypothesis accounts for many biochemical patterns common among schizophrenic patients.