dorp

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dorp

Archaic except in South Africa a small town or village
References in periodicals archive ?
Black juxtaposes the latter part of his narrative in which an ideal situation develops--symbolized by the romance between Ned and Anita, the mayor's daughter--with the strife and discord in the dorp in the first part of the novel.
Black reveals how they (do not) fit into the rigid social order of dorp culture.
He thus portrays--as a foil and to expose the folly of townspeople's prejudices--outsider characters who are automatically pushed to the margin of dorp society for no other reason than their difference.
Black's fictional dorp locale is not only distinctively South African (as the title suggests) but accurately registers, on a microcosmic scale, societal shifts and broader political developments.
Through the newspaper editor's character the fragility of the political situation in the dorp becomes apparent.
7) According to Kearney, the literary value of historical novels such as The Dorp lies in their capacity to recreate historical incidents and thereby give rise to an awareness of the gap between the actual and the ideal society.
The final chapter of Stephen Black's The Dorp presents a vision for an ideal South Africa.
The reader is made aware of the full extent of the dark undercurrents in the dorp and how repressive social dynamics impact on the minds of townsmen such as the main protagonist, Charlie Hendricks (the newspaper editor), Cyril Stein (the school board secretary), Dap van Zyl (the Volksparty candidate), Johannes Erasmus (the headmaster) and his brother Krisjan.
Although Willemsdorp represents the severest, most artistically achieved, critique of the South African dorp microcosm that was produced during the time, other small-town novels are no less interesting.
The introduction to the version B passage reads: "Charlie Hendricks felt that that little street had changed hardly at all since the time when the wagons of Willem Steyn's party had come to a stop by a stream amid thorn-trees, and their leader had announced that he would here found his village, his dorp that was to serve as the religious and administrative and social and commercial--in that order of importance--centre for the members of his trek, and of the treks that were coming after them, who would take up vast tracts of farming land, and till the soil, and breed cattle, and dispossess the kaffirs, and exterminate Africa's Midas-wealth of fauna, and become poor whites.
Bosman eschews Paton's rather simplistic view, which juxtaposes the edenic allegorical meaning of nature to the human imprint, symbolised by dorp settlement, on it.