dot-com


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Related to dot-com: Dot-com bubble, Dot-com crash

dot-com

(1) A commercial Internet domain name that uses the dot-com (.com) suffix at the end of the address; for example, www.computerlanguage.com is the domain name of the publisher of this encyclopedia. Since dot-com domains were used by all major corporations, the Internet became known as the "dot-com" world. See Internet domain name, dot-com company, dot-com bubble, not-com and dot-con.

(2) The .com domain spelled out in an email address on a website to prevent a spambot from identifying it. For example, instead of "alex@computerlanguage.com," the address is written as "alex at computerlanguage dot com." See spambot.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the early 2000s, the burst of the dot-com bubble also meant dissolution for many of the online broker pioneers.
Even at the cocktail gathering outside, before the event, one dot-com set up camp in a corner of the plaza outside the Biltmore Hotel, and the other marked off territory in another corner.
I had thousands of emails from dot-com employees informing me of the goings on in their companies," writes Kaplan.
Going forward, you have to differentiate between a dot-com strategy and a product-oriented strategy," says Geoffrey Moore, a partner in Mohr, Davidow Ventures, in Menlo Park, Calif.
Banks and asset-based lenders generally do not offer financing to the dot-com because of its limited operating history and lack of tangible assets to secure the financing.
I'm a big believer in the dot-com world,'' Kerstein said, his voice laced with irony.
Other CPAs see dot-pro as a potential marketing tool, but caution against giving up a dot-com too soon.
Putting your dot-com effort at arm's length to avoid a downside to your business if it fails may just end up being the reason it fails.
The leader of the pack Dot-com leaders are believers in changing the system, not preserving it.
Several home building-related Internet dot-com companies tell BUILDER that the investment stream shut down by the Great Internet Depression (read stock market collapse) last spring is starting to trickle again.
Lucre and disillusionment on the part of journalists aside, some dot-com converts also find the medium refreshingly different and challenging.
Well folks, it looks like it's time to head for land, because the bon voyage party is long over and we're running out of dot-com vessels that will reach their intended destinations.