dot-com

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dot-com

(1) A commercial Internet domain name that uses the dot-com (.com) suffix at the end of the address; for example, www.computerlanguage.com is the domain name of the publisher of this encyclopedia. Since dot-com domains were used by all major corporations, the Internet became known as the "dot-com" world. See Internet domain name, dot-com company, dot-com bubble, not-com and dot-con.

(2) The .com domain spelled out in an e-mail address on a Web site to prevent a spambot from identifying it. For example, instead of "alex@computerlanguage.com," the address is written as "alex at computerlanguage dot com." See spambot.
References in periodicals archive ?
The world of real estate dot-coms is, by anyone's lights, fragmented.
Fortunately, with the dot-com shakeout, advertisers are finding cheaper deals and a general willingness by portals to work on more media-rich innovations.
Dot-com currently does not block out these variant names when a multi-lingual domain is registered.
It probably goes without saying that, given the time frame you're working on at a dot-com, you can't afford too many surprises or mishaps; paradoxically, the breakneck speed practically dictates them.
While many dot-com companies are in trouble, there is still a tremendous need for space, so the timing of the program is still relevant.
com has emerged, of late, as the whipping boy of the dot-com world.
In the early 2000s, the burst of the dot-com bubble also meant dissolution for many of the online broker pioneers.
I had thousands of emails from dot-com employees informing me of the goings on in their companies," writes Kaplan.
It's a lesson many dot-coms learned the hard way as they burned through cash in an attempt to quickly gain market share.
The rest--the "pure play" dot-coms that bet on sufficient consumer interest in travel, pets or auctions, could very soon be knocking on portal doors begging to be let in--or bought out.
Putting references to The Who's "Won't Get Fooled Again" aside, participants agreed that survival in the dot-com industry hinges on the same basic business principles as survival in more traditional industries.
About 150 dot-com companies have failed in the past year, and dot-coms have eliminated nearly 42,000 jobs during that period.