double cluster


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double cluster

A pair of clusters that lie relatively close together. A well-known example is the pair h and Chi Persei, in which the individual clusters appear to be of similar age.

double cluster

[¦dəb·əl ′kləs·tər]
(astronomy)
A pair of globular clusters that are physically close to each other, near the northern boundary of the constellation Perseus.
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Poor Molly's mouth was rather wider open than usual, as she walked along with her eyes fixed on the double cluster of vessels in her hands, quite innocent of the expression in her mistress's eye.
Our next stop probably needs no introduction: Sweep 11[degrees] northwest of Alpha Persei to find the famous Double Cluster, NGC 869 and NGC 884 (Stop 2), one of the finest binocular sights in the entire sky.
I think my favorites of these delicate, lacy stitches may be a blue fan created with Cluster (CL) and Double Cluster (dCL) as well as chains and double crochet (dc) comprised of 5 rows set upon a chain of 10 +4 stitches repeated across and down as the work continues.
Much more compact are the Perseus Double Cluster now nearly overhead (near the center of the December and January maps), and dimmer M35, M37, M36, and M38, which run upward from the feet of Gemini onto Auriga.
58[degrees] (near the Double Cluster, on the Perseus-Cassiopeia border) climbs higher in the eastern sky.
BINOCULAR TARGETS HIGH in the winter sky the constellation of Perseus hosts the famous double cluster.
Binocular targets include the double cluster in Perseus NGC 884 and NGC 869.
By far the most prominent feature of Perseus is the magnificent double cluster often called 'The Sword Handle'.
Like an astronomical tourist, I was guided across the sky: the Orion nebula, that cloudy, star-forming region in the middle of the sword of the constellation; the double cluster in Perseus; Saturn; the furry glow around the aptly named Eskimo in the Gemini constellation; the open cluster of the Pleiades.
Professional astronomer Jurgen Stock seems to have been the first to spot it around 1957, but amateur observers didn't take notice until 1977, when John Pazmino stumbled across it while scanning for the nearby Double Cluster with a rich-field telescope.
The Double Cluster in Perseus (photo at right) looks like a dim, elongated bit of Milky Way; look for it plotted between Perseus and Cassiopeia, very high in the northeast.
When I was young the Double Cluster was always referred to as h & Chi Perseus, their Bayer designations, though it's hard to explain why they should have been seen as stars, as they are clearly nebulous.