double entendre


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double entendre

1. a word, phrase, etc., that can be interpreted in two ways, esp one having one meaning that is indelicate
2. the type of humour that depends upon such ambiguity
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References in periodicals archive ?
Maybe there is simply no way to avoid this double entendre.
Based on these arguments, the applicant argued that its mark creates a double entendre or pun, which in turn creates an incongruity showing that pregnancy text is not merely descriptive.
The new policy on double entendre names reads: "Aesthetically unsuitable names such as, Tip House, Pit Lane will be avoided, or names capable of deliberate misinterpretation like Hoare Road, Typple Avenue, Swag House, etc.
50) are named after a double entendre that we will not get into.
Wonders of Life (BBC Two, tonight, 9pm) | ONE of the best things about BBC Two's Stargazing Live is not just those incredible facts about the universe, but the banter between Brian Cox and Dara O' Briain, especially the odd double entendre they try to get away with before the watershed.
The double entendre name is a nod of recognition to its shapely servers, who model a variety of skimpy outfits that vary with holidays and special occasions.
There was not one double entendre in the music," Hodo said.
Wolfe Tone has an Irish rebel music band named after him, the Wolfe Tones, with the double entendre that a wolf tone is a spurious sound that can affect instruments of the violin family.
With an eye to the bawdy and lascivious double entendre of the original work, the annotations provide detailed analysis of linguistic turns and hidden meanings often not found in more traditional editions, based on newer, edited versions of the text.
E (The Hardest Ever) Three big guns gather on this song, which is already more famous for the double entendre (the hardest ever) than the music but the Black Eyed Peas' star's talent seems to be almost equal to his work ethic.