double monastery


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double monastery

A monastery and a nunnery adjacent to each other, sharing the same church and under the rule of the same superior.
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The Bede Museum celebrates the extraordinary life of the Venerable Bede, the Father of English history; a monk, author and scholar who lived at the Abbey Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, Wearmouth-Jarrow, a double monastery at Jarrow and Monkwearmouth, (today part of Sunderland), England.
He was the most gifted of the first generation of converts turned Christian scholars, who achieved the technically brilliant task of creating three of these Latin vulgate bibles, from many thousands of calf skins, at the double monastery of Wearmouth-Jarrow - the birthplace of the Codex Amiatinus bible.
Beach writes on Mathilde von Neuffen, one of five twelfth-century scribes at the double monastery of Zwiefalten whose names are known, arguing that she was one of many women involved in book production there.
She later became the abbess of the great double monastery at Whitby, ruling over not only her own community but a monastery of friars as well.
Green, who locates the text in its setting with an audience of women, probably at the double monastery Admont, highlighting the first example in German ofa newly emerging (once Patristic) reading of the Song of Songs with a focus on the individual women (16, 139-40, 203, 247, 251).
She returned to Ely where she founded a double monastery over which she served as abbess until her death in 679.
After the religious wars in the 1450s, the abbesses in charge were able to transform in every detail the Abbey Fontevraud, a double monastery of women and men religious, to the ostentation of the Counter-Reformation in the 1630s.
What is" known of this extraordinary woman, abbess of a double monastery of women and men, comes from the historian Venerable Bede, who chronicled the development of the early English church, including the contributions of this woman called "Mother" by all who knew and revered her.
Fontevrault is a compelling subject for this investigation since, as a double monastery, it contained communities for women and for men within one complex.
Hilda was born in 614 of noble birth, she became a nun at the age of 33, but went on to become Abbess of Whitby, a double monastery of monks and nuns.
focuses on Fontevrault, a double monastery headed by women, and its relationship with several culturally and politically powerful women of the French and English royal families, including Eleanor of Aquitaine.
If a female house was founded on land belonging to an abbess or her family it was likely to be isolated, hence the need for a double monastery to provide priests.