stain

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stain

a dye or similar reagent, used to colour specimens for microscopic study

Stain (microbiology)

Any colored, organic compound, usually called dye, used to stain tissues, cells, cell components, or cell contents. The dye may be natural or synthetic. The object stained is called the substrate. The small size and transparency of microorganisms make them difficult to see even with the aid of a high-power microscope. Staining facilitates the observation of a substrate by introducing differences in optical density or in light absorption between the substrate and its surround or between different parts of the same substrate. In electron microscopy, and sometimes in light microscopy (as in the silver impregnation technique of staining flagella or capsules), staining is accomplished by depositing on the substrate ultraphotoscopic particles of a metal such as chromium or gold (the so-called shadowing process); or staining is done by treating the substrate with solutions of metallic compounds such as uranyl acetate or phosphotungstic acid. Stains may be classified according to their molecular structure. They may also be classified according to their chemical behavior into acid, basic, neutral, and indifferent. This classification is of more practical value to the biologist. See Medical bacteriology

Stain

A coloring liquid or dye for application to any porous material, most often wood; thinner than paint and readily absorbed by the wood so that the texture and grain of the wood is enhanced, and not concealed.

stain

[stān]
(materials)
A nonprotective coloring matter used on wood surfaces; imparts color without obscuring the wood grains.
Any colored, organic compound used to stain tissues, cells, cell components, cell contents, or other biological substrates for microscopic examination.

stain

1. A discoloration in the surface of wood, plastic, sealant, etc.
2. A colorant for enhancing wood grain during finishing.
References in periodicals archive ?
6) was established on the Ki67/MART1 double stains without taking the information given by the MART1 stain into account (Figure 1, D).
In melanocytic pathology, novel research favors Ki67/ MART1 double stains to accurately distinguish Ki67-positive melanocytic cells from other proliferating Ki67-positive cells, mainly lymphocytes and stromal and epithelial cells.
Few studies have investigated the value of Ki67 indices quantified by DIA on single IHC stains, and to our knowledge none have been performed on IHC double stains.
A newly developed double stain using MUC4 and p53 was then evaluated because these 2 antibodies show staining limited to the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively, avoiding interference of interpretation between the stains.
The double stain with MUC4/p53 is shown in Figure 4 as follows: Figure 4, A and B, both MUC4 and p53 immunoreactivity in pancreatic adenocarcinoma; Figure 4, C, pancreatic adenocarcinoma showing staining for p53 and no immunoreactivity with MUC4; and Figure 4, D, pancreatic adenocarcinoma showing staining for MUC4 and no immunoreactivity with p53.