double tide

double tide

[¦dəb·əl ′tīd]
(oceanography)
A high tide comprising two maxima of nearly identical height separated by a relatively small depression, or low tide comprising two minima separated by a relatively small elevation.
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Through all her sixteen landward gates there had set for many years a double tide of empty-handed soldiers hurrying Francewards, and of enriched and laden bands who brought their spoils home.
The roadway was blocked with the immense stream of commerce flowing in a double tide inward and outward, while the footpaths were black with the hurrying swarm of pedestrians.
Sydney had been working double tides that night, and the night before, and the night before that, and a good many nights in succession, making a grand clearance among Mr.
My two experts arrived in the evening, and pretty well fagged, for they had traveled double tides.
Next morning all, except the cook, were rather ashamed of the ceremonies, and went to work double tides, speaking gruffly to one another.
The more recent Double Tide, 2009, is composed of two fifty-minute shots of a solitary clam digger extracting bivalves from the coastal muck, the first filmed at dawn, the second at dusk.
Agger, which rhymes with "badger," is an oceanographic term for a double tide -- a high tide, in which the water rises to a certain level, recedes, and then rises again; or a low tide, in which the water recedes to a certain level, rises slightly, and then recedes again.
One reason for moving to Southampton was the double tide served by the Solent.
Agger, which rhymes with "badger," is a nautical term for a double tide -- a high tide, in which the water rises to a certain level, recedes, then rises again; or a low tide, in which the water recedes to a certain level, rises slightly, then recedes again.
Southampton already enjoys many natural advantages such as double tides, closeness to the prosperous home counties and nearness to the more popular Mediterranean and Baltic destinations.