double-blind technique

double-blind technique

[¦dəb·əl ′blīnd ‚tek‚nēk]
(statistics)
An experimental procedure in which neither the subjects nor the experimenters know the makeup of the test and control group during the actual course of the experiments. Also known as blind trial.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The other side of the double-blind technique is that interviewers are not told in advance anything about the firm's performance.
Double-blind techniques, comparing two groups--one given the compound being tested and the other the inert substance--showed some promise.