heel

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Related to down-at-heel: dug in their heels, dig in his heels

heel

1
1. the back part of the human foot from the instep to the lower part of the ankle
2. the corresponding part in other vertebrates
3. Horticulture the small part of the parent plant that remains attached to a young shoot cut for propagation and that ensures more successful rooting
4. Nautical
a. the bottom of a mast
b. the after end of a ship's keel
5. the back part of a golf club head where it bends to join the shaft
6. Rugby possession of the ball as obtained from a scrum (esp in the phrase get the heel)

heel

2
inclined position from the vertical

Heel

The lower end of an upright member, especially one resting on a support.

What does it mean when you dream about a heel?

The heel is often used synonymously for the foot as a symbol, for example, to represent violence or oppression (e.g., under the heel of a dictator). As the part of the body most often in contact with the ground and dirt, it can be a symbol of the base or ignoble, for instance, a low, vile, contemptible, despicable person (a “heel”). The heel is also often represented by the analogous part of a shoe, which is frequently in shabby condition (“down at the heels”), perhaps signifying something in the dreamer’s life that needs attention. Finally, the heel can also represent vulnerability, as in an Achilles’ heel.

heel

[hēl]
(mechanical engineering)
(metallurgy)
A quantity of molten metal remaining in the ladle after pouring a metal cast-ing.
A quantity of metal retained in an induction furnace during a stand-by period.
(navigation)
Of a ship, to incline or to be inclined to one side.
(ordnance)
Upper corner of the butt of a rifle stock held in firing position.

heel

1. The lower end of an upright timber, esp. one resting on a support.
2. The lower end of the hanging stile of a door.
3. The floor brace for timbers that brace a wall.
4. The trailing edge of the blade of a bulldozer, or the like.
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, he gets a job caring for the animals in a down-at-heel travelling circus, and finds himself falling for one of the human performers (Reese Witherspoon).
Thanks to its previous incarnation as the Allerton House, a residential hotel for slightly down-at-heel gentlemen, The Pod 39 inherits a vast ground-floor lobby that is being reconfigured to create distinct public spaces.
was a tale with a happy ending about a down-at-heel farm.
Redevelopment in the down-at-heel Dale End area of the city has stalled since the developers of the planned pounds 550 million Martineau Galleries put the scheme on ice owing to the economic downturn.
With local council help, a 300-metre red light area was set up in the city's down-at-heel Ravensburger Street.
He played the down-at-heel, disaffected Cockney with a crude - but not smutty - charm, intertwining tonguein-cheek misogyny with recitations of Eric Clapton lyrics.
Similar in its love of 1950s schlock movies to The Rocky Horror Show, it's about the strange happenings in a down-at-heel florist shop.
And it's all the better for it too, as George Clooney smoulders to perfection as a down-at-heel fixer called in to handle a spot of damage limitation when a colleague suffers a nervous breakdown during a high profile case.
On his recent trip to London, the 'Mr and Mrs Smith' star preferred to shun celeb haunts like The Ivy and Soho House for a peaceful boozy afternoon at a small, down-at-heel Soho pub.
Rampant India's supremacy over down-at-heel England can be bought at 32 with Sporting, while the firm's total sixes quote of 9-9.
The MP said over the years the sign has been the subject of much negative media attention and perpetuated an image of Rhyl as down-at-heel and impoverished.
It hardly mattered the actors laboured with the high notes - it seemed almost fitting for the parts of the down-at-heel comrades.