downburst


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downburst

downburst
A local high-velocity downward movement of air mass flowing out of a thunderstorm. It is the chief cause of severe wind shear. The size of a downburst may vary from a ¼ mile to more than 10 miles. It can last from 5 to 30 minutes. The wind speed can go as high as 120 knots. It is potentially very dangerous, especially during the takeoff and landing phases.
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A downburst is a strong downdraft resulting in a outward burst of damaging winds on or near the ground.
The study finds that downbursts are dangerous to navigation.
As there was no visible funnel cloud, he said it was more likely a downburst than a small tornado - though he said it sounded like an un usually strong wind.
Downbursts - out-rushing air from thunderstorms that slam into the ground and can exceed 100 mph - can do plenty of damage.
The presence of high rates of in-cloud lightning often indicates the potential of severe weather phenomena, including heavy rain, large hail, dangerous cloud-to-ground lightning strikes, tornadoes and downburst winds.
Incredible, Elastigirl, Frozone, Dynaguy, Blazestone, Downburst, Everseer and many more
The presence of in-cloud lightning often indicates the potential of severe weather phenomena, including heavy rain, large hail, dangerous cloud-to-ground lightning strikes, tornadoes and downburst winds.
In-cloud lightning often serves as a precursor to heavy rain, large hail, dangerous cloud-to-ground lightning strikes, tornadoes and downburst winds.
In-cloud lightning detection at high efficiencies enables the prediction of severe weather phenomena such as heavy rain, hail, high winds, tornadoes, downburst winds and damaging cloud-to-ground strikes.
When a downburst is found, the system sounds a voice alert and also provides a red or yellow icon on the display screen.
These systems detect a very small fraction of in-cloud lightning, which is critical for advanced forecasting, or nowcasting, of severe weather phenomena such as tornadoes, damaging downburst winds, wind shear, and deadly cloud-to-ground lightning strikes that often follow five to 30 minutes after in-cloud activity begins.
For example, the Florida Selected Citrus canning plant near Groveland in Lake County was first reported to be hit by a tornado, but inspection later revealed that it was a severe downburst of wind that had caused more than $500,000 in damage to the plant.