dreadnought

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dreadnought

, dreadnaught
1. A battleship armed with heavy guns of uniform calibre
2. Slang a heavyweight boxer

Dreadnought

 

a British battleship that inaugurated this class of warships.

The design of the Dreadnought reflected the experiences of the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05, in which the inadequacies of the armorclads were revealed. Built in Portsmouth in 1905-06, the Dreadnought had a displacement of 17,900 tons and a speed of 21 knots (39 km/hr). Its armament consisted of ten 305-mm guns mounted on five two-gun towers; 24 76-mm guns mounted on the sides (on large-diameter towers) and on the bow and the stern; and five underwater torpedo tubes, four in the sides and one in the stern. Its armor was 280 mm thick at the center, 203 mm at the bow and the stern, 44-70 mm on the deck, and 280 mm around the towers and the deck cabins. The main difference between the Dreadnought and its predecessors, the armorclads, were the unified calibers of all the main and antimine artillery, greater speed, and antimine defense; a rhombic arrangement of the artillery towers made it possible to fire from the sides and stern from eight and from the bow from six guns of the main caliber. The Russian equivalent of the Dreadnought was the improved battleships of the Sevastopol’ type.

References in periodicals archive ?
While her new groom and family chawed happily on their flounder fillets and deep-fried scallops just a few yards away in the Dreadnaught dining room, here was the blushing bride, getting an impromptu send-off from a total stranger.
BIG FIGHT: Dave Vowles (left) and Ken Feltwell with Dreadnaught.
Mineralization at Dreadnaught occurs within two zones of albitized, stockworked and sulphidized diorite hosted within amphibolite grade basalts.
The Dreadnaught Area is located immediately south of the Countess-Tindals-Cyanide lode system along the Redemption Corridor, where the Joint Venture is currently conducting underground exploratory drilling (see September 22, 2005 news release).
French Group 3 winner Puppeteer, fifth in the Shadwell Turf Mile at Keeneland on his US debut, meets Grade 2 Red Smith Handicap winner Dreadnaught and Grade 2 Dixie Handicap winner Dr Brendler in the Grade 2, mile-and-a-half, William L McKnight Handicap at Calder.
This dreadnaught differs from Legend's impressive standard D-102 in that it employs certain design elements characteristic of the fine instruments manufactured by legendary builders prior to 1941.
Games slated for the CD-ROM include: Beamrider, Dreadnaught Factor, Happy Trails, Microsurgeon, Truckin', Dracula, B-17 Bomber and Mind Strike.
THE WATERBOY A TOWN HAS TURNED TO DUST BULWORTH FOREVER LOVE ONE TRUE THING DREADNAUGHT LIVING OUT LOUD ROYAL WARRIORS MENNO'S MIND THE WONDERFUL ICE CREAM SUIT POLISH WEDDING NO LAUGHING MATTER FIRELIGHT RESCUERS -- STORIES OF COURAGE -- TWO FAMILIES MY GIRLFRIEND'S BOYFRIEND BLOCKBUSTER(R) Hit List(TM) -- Video Games
218) On the other hand when Britain wanted dreadnaughts for the navy, (219) Laurier said, "Well, six is an awful lot, maybe we could give you one or two.
Prior confirms that the poor results were the result of a number of factors: the older pre-Dreadnaughts that made up the bulk of the fleet had aged and inaccurate guns; even the best naval gunfire from modern Dreadnaughts was typically ineffective against fixed fortifications and earthworks; the flatter trajectories of naval gunfire made it extremely difficult to destroy or damage the Turkish guns; and the extremely strong currents in the Dardanelles further decreased the accuracy of the British naval guns.
Notably, Corbett was a friend and ally of naval reformer Admiral John "Jackie" Fisher, who introduced such new developments as dreadnaughts, submarines, and aircraft carriers into the Royal Navy.
Part II of the poem concludes looking forward to her ninety-fourth year and her memories of the Kiel Regatta, the war-time patrols of destroyers and dreadnaughts, and eventually the surrender and scuttling of the German fleet.