drift bottle

drift bottle

[′drift ‚bäd·əl]
(oceanography)
A bottle which is released into the sea for studying currents; contains a card, identifying the date and place of release, to be returned by the finder with date and place of recovery. Also known as floater.
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References in periodicals archive ?
It was part of The Drift Bottle Project, a Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans survey.
The Drift Bottle Project was started in 2000 with drops along the west coast of Canada, around Alaska and through the Canadian Arctic.
Features like Shake, Look Around and Drift Bottle to name some will help WeChat users meet new friends and widen their network.
The drift bottle was among thousands dumped in the Atlantic Ocean between 1956 and 1972 as part of Bumpus' study of surface and bottom currents.
Drift bottle 646B, as it is known, was released on June 10, 1914 by Captain CH Brown of the Glasgow School of Navigation, as part of a batch of 1,890 scientific research bottles designed to sink towards the seabed.
It, too, was a bottom drift bottle and was recovered by fisherman Mark Anderson, of Shetland, in December 2006.
Drift bottle 646B was released in June 1914 by the Glasgow School of Navigation.
The old record was held by another bottom drift bottle, which was found by Andrew's friend Mark Anderson in December 2006.
During past projects in the area, researchers released tens of thousands of drift bottles over a period of several years and recovered a few thousand.