potable

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potable

[′pōd·ə·bəl]
(science and technology)
Suitable for drinking.
References in periodicals archive ?
The drinking water market analysis is provided for the international markets including development trends, competitive landscape analysis, and key regions development status.
5 billion to construct or rehabilitate intake structures, wells and spring collectors EPA allocates Drinking Water State Revolving Fund grants to states based on the finding of the assessment.
That was the case in Washington, where 40,000 water service lines were replaced after the District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority found drinking water lead above the action level of 15 parts per billion in 73% of the 4,613 homes tested.
But many poor countries, like Bangladesh, can't afford to properly treat drinking water.
AEL), which analyzes most of the drinking water in northeastern Ontario, plus effluent, soil and air quality analysis, and landfill monitoring.
which owns the lab, discovered tritium at a high of 80,000 picocuries per liter - four times the 20,000 ppl standard for drinking water.
In a trial in Bolivia, locally fabricated filters that used imported ceramic candles eliminated all detectable fecal coliform bacteria in household drinking water and reduced levels of diarrhea by 64% (13).
The new rules require the EPA to establish a list of technologies that achieve compliance and are affordable and applicable to small drinking water systems, but it still has not done so.
The recommendations strongly support drinking water with optimal levels of fluoride and following self-care practices such as brushing at least twice a day with fluoridated toothpaste.
Geochemical and hydrogeological contrasts between shallow and deeper aquifers in two villages of Araihazar, Bangladesh: Implications for deeper aquifers as drinking water sources.
Water wells tainted with four to 19 ppb in Simi Valley are not used for drinking water and the few groundwater drinking-water wells in the city have not shown any perchlorate, according to the Southern California Water Co.

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