driving resistance

driving resistance

[′drīv·iŋ ri′zis·təns]
(mechanics)
The force exerted by soil on a pile being driven into it.

driving resistance

The number of blows of a pile-driving hammer which are required to advance the point of a pile a specified distance into the subsoil.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each and every one of us, prescribers and recipients alike, need to understand the gravity of the situation, the fact that overuse and misuse of antibiotics is driving resistance, and put a stop to inappropriate prescribing.
Resistance has already stolen much of their magic and the practices that are driving resistance at an even quicker pace are not likely to stop.
Regulation ECE 83, in relation to the realization of the driving cycles, recommends using a chassis dynamometer that can reflect the total driving resistance in the speed range from 10 to 120 km/h.
In this mode the gasoline engine is switched off and disengaged from the drivetrain, enabling the vehicle to move along without combustion or electric power with engine drag forces and their braking effect being eliminated to reduce driving resistance.
Dermatologic prescribing of antibiotics for acne and rosacea, as well as for skin infections, may be driving resistance in unexpected ways, said Dr.
Considering the fact that the part of the energy is spent on overcoming the driving resistance and the rest of the energy is transformed into heat during friction on the brake it is possible to write the next equation
The single greatest factor driving resistance to a given antibiotic is simply use of the drug.
The epidemiology of MRSA and the factors driving resistance bear strong similarities and parallels to those occurring with penicillin-resistant strains of S.