drossing

drossing

[′drȯs·iŋ]
(metallurgy)
A process used in nonferrous pyrometallurgy for removing solid oxide deposits on the surface of a molten metal.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, when flux injection is part of the process, the dross becomes treated in-situ with an appropriate drossing flux composition, such that the amount of dross becomes substantially lower (Fig.
The reactivity in a drossing flux is due to the combination of oxidizers and double fluoride compounds.
A good drossing flux must be designed to reduce the rich metallic aluminum content of the dross.
They have similar chlorides and oxidizing compounds as drossing fluxes, but in different proportions.
C86300 is the most prone to drossing in this family of alloys.
After an additional treatment in the ladle with a drossing flux, the dross weighed an average of 5 lb.
The low-lead tin bronze (alloy C83450) was the most difficult to cast in a permanent mold because of its high drossing tendency and proneness to hot tearing.
The low-zinc yellow brass (C85200) also was susceptible to drossing and hot tearing, while the high-zinc yellow brass (C85800) was prone to drossing but not to hot tearing.
In this part, the economics of drossing flux is covered as well as some concerns foundries should keep in mind when using flux, including safety, casting quality and legal disposal.
or more metallic aluminum, much of which can be returned to the melt with a drossing flux.
To accelerate this process, drossing fluxes contain exothermic compounds that release oxygen and generate heat by combusting a portion of the metallic aluminum (Al and alloying elements such as Mg) in the dross.
For flux to be most efficient, it should achieve the maximum contact with the metal, particularly for drossing.