dryline

dryline

[′drī‚līn]
(meteorology)
The boundary separating warm dry air from warm moist air along which thunderstorms and tornadoes may develop.
References in periodicals archive ?
This air, from the interior deserts--sometimes containing dust--clashes with the tropical air in Texas, producing a dryline.
NYC allocated $170 million for the construction of storm water management infrastructure that will complement The Dryline.
Dryline of external walls, removal of existing entrance lobby and replacement of same with modifications, enhancement of exposed vaulted roof.
This month Malcolm landed the Prince's Trust, Prince's Initiative for Mature Enterprise and Sage One accounts Senior Entrepreneur of the Year award for the Rotaire Dryline.
This collision, called a dryline, causes the moist air to rise and form thunderstorms.
The new InLine technology is a family of triple-layer fabrics that include PrintLine, ThinLine, and DryLine products.
Moisture-wicking linings such as DriClime, Dryline, and Hydrofil add warmth and spread out condensation, making the inside of a jacket feel drier.
PHOTO : Dryline motors in Desoutter's orbital sanders run without any lubrication.
Similar to its peer dehydrator, DryLine Mojave, Sahara features a one-of-a-kind, patented air circuit path that can support large volume systems in a fraction of the space or cost of traditional solutions.
Kessler also excitedly discussed the dynamics of the dryline (where many severe storms form), which were at the time being studied by Joe Schaefer, who subsequently became the director of the National Severe Storms Forecast Center in Kansas City.
No convective advisories were in place over the west Texas region, but the briefer advised the pilot about the dryline pattern over that region with abundant moisture.