duct

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Related to ductal: Ductal carcinoma in situ, ductal hyperplasia

duct

1. any bodily passage, esp one conveying secretions or excretions
2. a narrow tubular cavity in plants, often containing resin or some other substance
3. a channel or pipe carrying electric cable or wires

Duct

A nonmetallic or metallic tube for housing wires or cables, may be underground or embedded in concrete floor slabs; a duct usually fabricated of metal, used to transfer air from one location to another.

duct

[dəkt]
(anatomy)
An enclosed tubular channel for conducting a glandular secretion or other body fluid.
(communications)
An enclosed runway for cables.
(geophysics)
The space between two air layers, or between an air layer and the earth's surface, in which microwave beams are trapped in ducting. Also known as radio duct; tropospheric duct.
(mechanical engineering)
A fluid flow passage which may range from a few inches in diameter to many feet in rectangular cross section, usually constructed of galvanized steel, aluminum, or copper, through which air flows in a ventilation system or to a compressor, supercharger, or other equipment at speeds ranging to thousands of feet per minute.

duct

1. ,See air duct.
2. In electric systems, a metallic or nonmetallic tube, (usually circular, oval, rectangular, or octagonal) for housing wires or cables; may be underground or embedded in concrete floor slabs.

duct

A thin-wall tube installed in aircraft air-conditioning and heating systems to carry heated or cooled air for distribution to various aircraft locations.
References in periodicals archive ?
The purpose of this study was to determine if prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma is undersampled on routine template TRUS-guided biopsy specimens and whether it is under-reported by pathologists in routine clinical practice.
Conversely, ductal neoplasms retain the dominant membrane immunostaining pattern of p120 catenin.
Cell biological factors in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast-relationship to ipsilateral local recurrence and histopathological characteristics.
s-MRCP is the optimal and sometimes only option for evaluating pancreatic ductal anatomy in patients with bowel diversions that preclude ERCP, including a roux-en-Y gastric bypass and a Whipple procedure.
2) While malignancies of the accessory parotid gland are rare, when they do occur they jeopardize ductal integrity.
quarried limestone, plus tile and countertops of Ductal ultra-high performance concrete.
Coexistence of gynecomastia and ductal carcinoma, though rare, has been reported (7).
Early changes that can lead to ductal breast carcinoma include both usual ductal hyperplasia (UDH) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH).
According to the results, current use of calcium-channel blockers for 10 or more years was associated with higher risks of ductal breast cancer and lobular breast cancer.
Biomarkers from breast tissue may predict the subsequent risk of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) recurrence and invasive breast cancer, according to a new study.
In a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of exemestane in Canada, USA, Spain and France, eligible post-menopausal women over 35 years old had at least one of the following risk factors: 60 years of age or older, prior atypical ductal or lobular hyperplasia or lobular carcinoma in situ, or ductal carcinoma in situ with mastectomy.