due diligence


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due diligence

Research; analysis; your homework. This term has caught on in all industries, because it sounds so "wired." Who would want to do analysis or research when they can do due diligence. See wired.
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Between November 2014 and January 2016, ASIC conducted systematic reviews of the due diligence practices of 12 IPO issuers, ranging from small, mid-sized and larger offers and a sample of offers from emerging market issuers.
If you need an equity due diligence investigation, be sure to let the firms you're considering know your risk tolerance level and provide as much information about the physical plant to be purchased as you feel you can divulge.
As a result, companies and organizations of diverse backgrounds may contemplate any number of challenging decisions in developing a third-party due diligence program.
If the investor requires finance to acquire the target the bank will normally require due diligence report(s) to be prepared by external parties to assist with their financing decision.
However, mere diffusion of a label such as due diligence does not necessarily imply that practices related to it are adopted and implemented.
Let's consider the impact of inadequate due diligence from the buyer's perspective to understand why buyers treat this as so important.
Purchase Price/Valuation: Better quality due diligence can indicate whether the asking price is too high, or whether there is "hidden" value in the business.
In general, the purposes of FCPA due diligence with respect to third parties with which a business relationship is proposed are: (1) to assess the reputation of the third party, especially with regard to ethical issues; and (2) to determine whether any foreign official may be involved in the third party as an owner, officer, director, or employee, so that the risks of that involvement can be evaluated and appropriate safeguards developed.
A Rule 144A offering by a mutual or other nonpublic company (for example, the wholly owned subsidiary of a public company or a mutual holding company) will create the need for due diligence and disclosure that may be more extensive than what the company has previously undergone in prior capital-raising via private placements or institutional lending.
The due diligence process is also critical here, since much of the information needed to complete regulatory filings will be obtained from the seller during the purchaser's due diligence investigation.
He continues, "With more due diligence, lenders can command a premium right now.
Typically, these include contracts and related documentation and due diligence files.