dug


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dug

the nipple, teat, udder, or breast of a female mammal
References in classic literature ?
They got a spade at the crib and dug out the body, and you never see such an excitement.
I will bury that nasty person in the hole which he has dug.
We dug the grave, and the polypi undertake to seal our dead for eternity.
He informed him that much secrecy and caution must be observed in enterprises of the kind; that money is only to be dug for at night, with certain forms and ceremonies and burning of drugs, the repeating of mystic words, and, above all, that the seekers must first be provided with a divining rod,[3] which had the wonderful property of pointing to the very spot on the surface of the earth under which treasure lay hidden.
By-and-by he dug so close to her that the fire-beams were reflected as distinctly from the steel prongs of his fork as from her own.
He wondered why they had dug a great hole in the ground merely to bury dry bones.
Then they rode downhill and uphill, across a ryefield trodden and beaten down as if by hail, following a track freshly made by the artillery over the furrows of the plowed land, and reached some fleches* which were still being dug.
He turned his head, dug with his hand through the snow about him and opened his eyes.
And, midway, he dug down through the red volcanic earth that had washed from the disintegrating hill above, until he uncovered quartz, rotten quartz, that broke and crumbled in his hands and showed to be alive with free gold.
And it would dig and lay, and continue to dig and lay, while a black dug out its eggs within two or three feet of it.
A robber, who had noticed this, went and dug up the gold and decamped with it.
I drew the short cutlass with which both officers and men of the navy are, as you know, armed out of courtesy to the traditions and memories of the past, and with its point dug into the loam about the roots of the vegetation growing at my feet.