dugout

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dugout:

see canoecanoe
, long, narrow watercraft with sharp ends originally used by most peoples. It is usually propelled by means of paddles, although sails and, more recently, outboard motors are also used.
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dugout

[′dəg‚au̇t]
(ordnance)
Underground shelter built to protect troops, ammunition, and material from gunfire.

dugout

A primitive shelter, often consisting of an excavation in a bank of sloping terrain that is roofed with bark laid over a pole framework, then covered with sod; also see half-dugout.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the canoe center is an embassy, then a traditional dugout canoe is the best possible ambassador.
The far-flung lodge was a three-hour bus ride from Quito, followed by a flight from the town of Shell to the jungle, then many hours downriver by dugout canoe.
It's because of that forest is still there, and because of that we have the art of canoe carving and because of that, today, I can go there in a traditional dugout canoe and show people culturally-modified trees and we can have a traditional salmon barbecue with wild salmon.
Waterways in different parts of Australia carried different types of watercraft ranging from the dugout canoes of northern Australia, to dugout canoes with outriggers in northern Queensland, to the bark canoe of the Murray River, and the bundled reed boat of Tasmania.
According to plaintiff Leaf Hillman, a ceremonial leader from the Karuk Tribe, tribal members and fishermen transported two Native American dugout canoes to Omaha where Berkshire Hathaway shareholders are meeting May 4-5.
They traveled in lightweight birch bark canoes, unlike the heavier pirogues and dugout canoes favored by Lewis and Clark.
Native artifacts such as dugout canoes and fish-drying racks will add to the interest and enhance the educational value of this section of the exhibit.
With winds whipping up four-foot waves, a few paddlers jumped into one of the dugout canoes and rushed out to try to attract the whale.
A place where the Quapaw and choctaws paddled dugout canoes, ivory-billed woodpeckers shreded bark from ancient trees, and mallard ducks rained down ahead of the first autumn blue norther.
Already Florida natives were constructing mounds and traveling in dugout canoes.
They glide smoothly along a nearby tributary in dugout canoes, the beams of their flashlights crossing and uncrossing above the murky river waters.
Soon they are joined by the children who scramble into old and cracked dugout canoes to clean their nances with lukewarm lagoon water.