jacket

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jacket

Engineering
1. any exterior covering or casing, such as the insulating cover of a boiler
2. the part of the cylinder block of an internal-combustion engine that encloses the coolant

Jacket

 

a covering, usually removable, of a book or booklet in the form of a sheet with flaps. It is generally made of heavy paper coated for purposes of reinforcement or covered with a transparent synthetic film that also improves the jacket’s appearance. Jackets are sometimes made from polymer films. Originally, jackets were used to protect the bindings of expensive editions from damage; they were later used for purposes of publicity as well. The jacket sometimes serves a purely aesthetic purpose.

jacket

[′jak·ət]
(mechanical engineering)
The space around an engine cylinder through which a cooling liquid circulates.
(nucleonics)
A thin container for one or more fuel slugs, used to prevent the fuel from escaping into the coolant of a reactor. Also known as can; cartridge.
(ordnance)
Cylinder of steel covering and strengthening the breech end of a gun or howitzer tube.
The water jacket on some machine guns.
(petroleum engineering)
The support structure of a steel offshore production platform; it is fixed to the seabed by piling, and the superstructure is mounted on it.

jacket

jacket, 1
1. A metal or cloth covering over the heat insulation which is applied to exposed heating pipes and ducts.
2. An outer casing around a pipe or vessel, the space between being filled with a fluid for cooling, heating, or maintaining a fixed temperature.

jacket

jacket
A metal shroud used to insulate a portion of the hot section of a gas turbine engine. A jacket prevents heat damage to the aircraft structure.

jacket

A plastic housing that contains a floppy disk. The 5.25" disk is built into a flexible jacket; the 3.5" disk uses a rigid jacket.
References in periodicals archive ?
But what is rare is the survival of the dust jacket.
On the dust jacket of The Moral Obligation To Be Intelligent, Lionel Trilling, Columbia professor, critic, novelist, self styled "progressive liberal," has taken his cigarette to his mouth and is gazing solemnly into a middle distance, his hair white, his eyes dark, his expression contemplative.
There are no 'get-rich-overnight' claims festooned to the dust jacket here, however.
Indeed, any unity that these free associations may have is provided in the last analysis solely by the consciousness of the author himself, who, for those curious enough to unfold the unusually thick dust jacket and examine its other side, gazes out somberly from a 16" x 19" photograph.
The dust jacket indicates that this anthology might be a good place to begin reading Waugh's work, and that may be true of the polished, published stories, but only dedicated fans are interested in excerpts of novels or early writings.
First published in 1991, this novel, according to its dust jacket, "is a skeptic's wry inquest into the meaning of God and of human existence--the story of a savior who is at once the son of
The dust jacket of an embossed ripped torso proved that, at least in the discerning eyes of many men, packaging is still everything.
It is, as the dust jacket proclaims, the first narrative history of women and religion in America, but it is not in any sense a new narrative.
The reproduction of Benjamin West's painting Penn's Treaty With the Indians on the dust jacket suggests one specific way to read the book's title, but other thefts are chronicled here also: soldiers robbed by war, cultures robbed by colonizers, nature robbed by poachers.
Wyeth, so it was not surprising to see that Scott named Wyeth as an influence in a short biography on the dust jacket.
The words with Jim Denney appear inside the book near the front but nowhere on the dust jacket.
The dust jacket pictures a wandering Elizabethan fool.