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die,

any of various devices used for drawing wire, and for blanking, bending, cutting, machine forging, and embossing. Dies used for striking, or stamping, coins and medals are cut in intaglio, one for the front, another for the back, of the coin. Such dies were used as early as c.800 B.C. in Greece. Diemaking, or diesinking, formerly entirely a hand process in which the graver (a cutting tool), riffler (a file), and chisel were employed, has been accelerated in modern times by the use of diemaking machines supplemented by hand finishing. A punch, or male die, is commonly made as the counterpart in relief of the original die, or matrix; both are preserved as models, and duplicates are made from them for working dies. Sheet metal or other material is blanked (cut) out, shaped, or embossed between the dies by power-operated levers or drop hammers, or by die-castingdie-casting,
process by which molten metal is forced by a plunger or compressed air into a metallic die and the pressure maintained until the metal has solidified. Die castings are accurate, are sharply outlined, have a good surface finish, and can be made in complicated designs.
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. The die used for drawing wire or extruding rods is made of hard metal with a hole or a series of progressively smaller holes through which the metal is forced. For making screws or threading pipe a hollow hard metal die with internal threading is used.

die

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(design engineering)
A tool or mold used to impart shapes to, or to form impressions on, materials such as metals and ceramics.
(electronics)
The tiny, sawed or otherwise machined piece of semiconductor material used in the construction of a transistor, diode, or other semiconductor device; plural is dice.
(medicine)
To pass from physical life.
(mining engineering)

die

die, 1
1. The middle portion of a pedestal between the base (or plinth) and the surbase; also called a dado.
2. A tool for cutting threads on pipe, screws, etc.

die

1. 
a. a shaped block of metal or other hard material used to cut or form metal in a drop forge, press, or similar device
b. a tool of metal, silicon carbide, or other hard material with a conical hole through which wires, rods, or tubes are drawn to reduce their diameter
2. an internally-threaded tool for cutting external threads
3. a casting mould giving accurate dimensions and a good surface to the object cast
4. Architect the dado of a pedestal, usually cubic

die

(jargon)
crash. Unlike crash, which is used primarily of hardware, this verb is used of both hardware and software.

See also go flatline, casters-up mode.

die

(electronics)
Plural: dies. An unpackaged integrated circuit.

die

An unpackaged, bare chip. A die is the formal term for the square of silicon containing an integrated circuit. Die is singular, and dice is plural. The terms die and chip are often used synonymously.


Dice on a Wafer
This picture of several dice on the wafer shows the various subsystems on each die (chip). This image is called a "beauty shot," because the different areas are colored for presentation. (Image courtesy of Texas Instruments, Inc.)
References in periodicals archive ?
The questions to be asked are familiar: which parts are painful and may therefore be made better by the easing of pain; which parts are inherited through the genome and may therefore be made better by the manipulation of the genome or the addition or subtraction of a gene or a protein; which parts are conscious, and which are unconscious, so that we may better understand how it feels to be dying and learn how to alleviate the worst of those feelings.
Beginning with Elisabeth Kubler-Ross's 1970 classic, On Death and Dying, many serious studies of dying have been built around interviews with people in the last days of their lives.
A person's last days can be the most remarkable example of dying as an aspect of living: without hope, a dying person begins to pull away from the world, sleeping a lot, not seeing anyone, not interested in anyone.
Much dying today happens poorly, with unnecessary pain.
Dying well is a matter of coming to grips with the losses and suffering associated with dying, while helping others to die well is largely a question of learning to accompany and compassionately care for them in the dying process.
In a passage that sounds very similar to Peck, Byock describes what he means by dying well and what characterizes those patients and families who manage to negotiate the pilgrimage of dying with some real grace.
In the broadest sense, it was as if dying from a progressive illness had provided them with opportunities to resolve and complete their relationships and to get their affairs in order.
And Byock believes that the way to take advantage of that opportunity is to face the suffering and challenges dying brings.
But leaving the dying process "informal" has, to date, resulted in the rights of the dying being denied, ignored, and overridden in a random and arbitrary fashion by virtually everyone involved.
The Quinlan decision did not, however, remedy the needless and cruel suffering of most dying patients.
Those, however, who maintain that there is some "better" way to secure physician aid in dying for terminally ill Americans in great suffering must bear the burden of formulating and presenting that alternative.
Isn't it self-evident, therefore, that, in order to grant the wishes of dying patients for help to end their suffering, we have to change the fact that doing so is against the law?