dynamic aquaplaning/hydroplaning

dynamic aquaplaning/hydroplaning

A phenomenon in which aircraft tires run at a high speed over shallow standing water and ride up out of contact with the runway, rendering the brakes practically ineffective. Such a condition occurs usually when the runway is wet and the fluid (water or slush) is not displaced at a rate fast enough from the tire or ground contact area. A melted area of tire can achieve the same effect, whether on a wet or a dry runway and is called reverted rubber hydroplaning. As a rule, an aircraft will experience dynamic aquaplaning on a wet runway when its speed is 8.6 times the square root of its tire pressure in pounds per square inch. The minimum full hydroplaning speed (when the entire tire is lifted off the runway) is 9 times the square root of the tire pressure in psi and 7.7 times the square root of the tire pressure in psi when stationary wheels land on a flooded runway. See aquaplaning.
Full browser ?