dysgerminoma


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dysgerminoma

[¦dis·jər·mə′nō·mə]
(medicine)
An ovarian tumor composed of large polygonal cells of germ-cell origin, resembling seminoma of the testis, but less malignant. Also known as embryoma of the ovary.
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These findings are consistent with metastatic dysgerminoma.
Both embryonal carcinoma and dysgerminoma stain for OCT-4, [15] but only embryonal carcinoma stains for CD-30.
Dysgerminomas are the ovarian counterparts of testicular seminomas; they are occasionally bilateral, most common in adolescence and associated with elevated [beta]-HCG and LDH.
Common tumor markers associated with germ cell malignancies Benign Dysgerminoma Immature Endodermal teratoma teratoma sinus tumor AFP - - +/- ++ HCG - +/- - - LDH - ++ - +/- Estradiol - +/- +/- - PLAP * - ++ - - Embryonal Nongestational tumor choriocarcinoma AFP +/- - HCG ++ ++ LDH +/- +/- Estradiol +/- - PLAP * - - ++ Present +/- Occasionally present, reported - Not present at discriminatory levels or reported outside of case reports * placental alkaline phosphatase Source: Berek & Hacker's Gynecologic Oncology, Comprehensive Gynecology, Cancer Treat Rev.
These results confirmed a final diagnosis of mixed GCT with dysgerminoma and embryonal carcinoma.
Dysgerminoma with a slightly elevated alpha-fetoprotein level diagnosed as a mixed germ cell tumor after recurrence.
01%) of which dysgerminoma was the commonest malignant subtype constituting 14 cases (6.
Of these, the most common pediatric ovarian germ cell tumor is dysgerminoma (FIGURE 3).
The gonads of XY pure gonadal dysgenesis have a high risk of gonadoblastoma and germ cell tumour, particularly dysgerminoma.
The differential diagnosis of solid ovarian tumours includes rhabdomyosarcoma, extragonadal teratoma, neurogenic tumour, granulosa cell tumour and dysgerminoma.
A neoplastic enlargement of the ovary can be caused either by tumoural changes of follicle or corpus luteum components (granulosa-theca cell tumour, teratoma, dysgerminoma, cystadenoma, cystadenocarcinoma, arrhenoblastoma), or of mesodermal tissue (fibroma, leiomyoma) or the condition can develop after metastasis (lymphoma, melanoma) (Bosu and Smith 1992, Chassy et al.