dysgerminoma


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dysgerminoma

[¦dis·jər·mə′nō·mə]
(medicine)
An ovarian tumor composed of large polygonal cells of germ-cell origin, resembling seminoma of the testis, but less malignant. Also known as embryoma of the ovary.
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Ovarian neoplasms Surface Origin epithelium Germ cells Frequency 65 - 70% 15 - 20% % of malignant 90% 3 - 5 % Age 20+ 0 - 25+ Types Serous Teratoma Mucinous Dysgerminoma Endometrioid Endodermal sinus Clear Cell Choriocarcinoma Brenner Origin Parenchyma (sex cord-stroma) Metastases Frequency 5 - 10% 5% % of malignant 2 - 3% 5% Age All Variable Types Fibroma Granulosa-theca cell tumor Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor Cystadenofibroma Adapted from: Robbins and Cotran; Pathologic Basis of Disease, 7th Ed Copyright [C] 2005 Elsevier Junqueira and Carneiro; Basic Histology, 11th Ed Copyright [C] 2005 McGraw-Hill Antonio Westphalen, M.
Specific diagnoses and clear descriptions or illustrations do reveal the existence of rare cases of nonteratomatous GCTs, including dysgerminoma, yolk sac tumor, and embryonal carcinoma.
Also identified were single incidences of dysgerminoma, mesothelioma, liposarcoma, cloacal papilloma, cloacal adenocarcinoma, and gizzard carcinoma.
These include dysgerminoma, endodermal sinus tumor, and immature teratoma.
Apart from lymphatic endothelial cells, expression of podoplanin in tumor cells has been reported in some cancer types including squamous cell carcinoma in the lung, (7-10) malignant mesothelioma, (11,12) Kaposi sarcoma, angiosarcoma, (13) hemangioblastoma, (14) dysgerminoma, (7) and brain tumors.
Dysgerminoma in an Eastern rosella (Platycercus eximius eximius).
In these cases, a dysgerminoma should be considered in a young woman and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in an elderly patient.
This report describes a case of dysgerminoma in a 21-year-old eastern rosella (Platycercus eximius eximius) that presented with dyspnea and a severely distended coelom.
Patients with gonadal dysgenesis, who have a Y chromosome on karyotypic analysis or have evidence of Y chromosome fragments by molecular analysis, have an increased risk for developing germ cell tumors, particularly dysgerminoma.
In these 2 studies, the main finding is not only that OCT4 is a highly sensitive and specific marker of ovarian dysgerminoma, and testicular seminoma and embryonal carcinoma, respectively, but also that the OCT4 staining pattern was nuclear (in contrast to PLAP and c-Kit, which show characteristically cell membrane staining), with uniformly strong staining intensity and staining extent of greater than 90%.
Tumors of the ovaries include granulosa cell tumors, ovarian carcinomas, dysgerminomas, arrhenoblastomas, and teratomas.