dyskinesia


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dyskinesia

[‚dis·kə′nē·zhə]
(medicine)
Disordered movements of voluntary or involuntary muscles, particularly those seen in disorders of the extrapyramidal system.
Impaired voluntary movements.
References in periodicals archive ?
So it's very difficult for clinicians to know when dyskinesia is occurring.
sup][12],[15],[54] However, treatment with istradefylline could result in adverse reactions, of which dyskinesia is the most common.
Two authors (WZ and D-BC) independently and systematically searched English (PubMed, PsyclNFO, Embase, Cochrane Library databases) and Chinese databases (Wanfang Data, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), SINOMED), with each database from their inception until June 8, 2017, using the following search terms: (Tardive Dyskinesia OR Dyskinesia*, Tardive OR Dyskinesias, Tardive OR Dystonias, Tardive) AND (Melatonine OR Melatonin).
In a statement, Mitchell Mathis, MD, director of the FDA's division of psychiatry products in the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, praised the approval as "an important advance for patients suffering with tardive dyskinesia.
Antiparkinsonism agents generally does not improve neuroleptic induced dyskinesia.
In this study, a patient who developed withdrawal dyskinesia and supersensitivity psychosis because of discontinuing olanzapine is presented.
The report provides a snapshot of the global therapeutic landscape of Dyskinesia
The effect of foetal DA neuron transplants on LID has been variable; in some patients a significant reduction of LID has been observed, while in others dyskinesia has been unaffected or even made worse [4, 7, 8, 10, 18].
A review of the Dyskinesia products under development by companies and universities/research institutes based on information derived from company and industry-specific sources
Tardive dyskinesia (TD) refers to at least moderate abnormal involuntary movements in [greater than or equal to] 1 areas of the body or at least mild movements in [greater than or equal to] 2 areas of the body, developing after [greater than or equal to] 3 months of cumulative exposure (continuous or discontinuous) to dopamine D2 receptor-blocking agents.
Morningside's investment in Synchroneuron demonstrates our belief in the potential of SNC-102 to safely and effectively treat neuropsychiatric disorders such as tardive dyskinesia as well as its potential in additional indications, said Gerald Chan, Chairman of Morningside Technology Ventures.
Approximately one half of patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia are having Kartagener syndrome.