dyslexia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

dyslexia

(dĭslĕk`sēə), in psychology, a developmental disability in reading or spelling, generally becoming evident in early schooling. To a dyslexic, letters and words may appear reversed, e.g., d seen as b or was seen as saw. Many dyslexics never learn to read or write effectively, although they tend to show above average intelligence in other areas. With the aid of computerized brain scans such as positron emission tomography (PET), recent studies have offered strong evidence that dyslexia is located in the brain. Damage to the brain can cause a reading disability similar to dyslexia, known as acquired dyslexia or alexia.

dyslexia

[dis′lek·sē·ə]
(medicine)
Impairment of the ability to read.

dyslexia

a developmental disorder which can cause learning difficulty in one or more of the areas of reading, writing, and numeracy
References in periodicals archive ?
According to NICHD, dyslexia "is neurobiological in origin.
One of the authors of this manuscript has dyslexia but has successfully completed his Ph.
For more information call the British Dyslexia Association on 0118 966 2677 or visit www.
I've searched high and low for that magic pill, but without dyslexia I would not be the composer that I am today.
A group led by geneticist Juha Kere of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm has also found a strong association between variations within DCDC2 and severe dyslexia, as indicated by a pronounced spelling disorder.
Interest in dyslexia can be traced back to the work of Samuel Orton in the late 1930's.
Sir Jackie, who won three world championships in 1969, 71 and 73, said that because of his dyslexia he was regarded as "thick" when he was at school in Dumbarton.
Michael Ryan, the LSC's regional media skills manager, said: 'Given the prospective growth of the West Midland's creative industries sector it is imperative that employers are made aware of the issues and given the help and guidance they need to support and get the best out of their employees with dyslexia.
The British Dyslexia Association wanted every local authority to be 'Dyslexia Friendly' by 2012.
The SNP promised pounds 30million of additional support for children with dyslexia and autism in their election manifesto in 2007.
Rachel Robillard, who oversees dyslexia intervention for the Austin Independent School District, said the district hopes to soon have at least one certified academic language therapist in each of its 129 Austin campuses to aid in early identification.
az and her colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig, a major step forward has been made in understanding the cause of dyslexia.