dyslexia

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dyslexia

(dĭslĕk`sēə), in psychology, a developmental disability in reading or spelling, generally becoming evident in early schooling. To a dyslexic, letters and words may appear reversed, e.g., d seen as b or was seen as saw. Many dyslexics never learn to read or write effectively, although they tend to show above average intelligence in other areas. With the aid of computerized brain scans such as positron emission tomography (PET), recent studies have offered strong evidence that dyslexia is located in the brain. Damage to the brain can cause a reading disability similar to dyslexia, known as acquired dyslexia or alexia.

dyslexia

[dis′lek·sē·ə]
(medicine)
Impairment of the ability to read.

dyslexia

a developmental disorder which can cause learning difficulty in one or more of the areas of reading, writing, and numeracy
References in periodicals archive ?
Workshops led by experienced teachers and advisors will show how different ways of teaching can benefit dyslexics throughout the school years, at college and in everyday life.
An author of many books and articles on the subject, Prof Miles set up Bangor University's Dyslexia Unit in 1974, with the help of his wife Elaine, to provide specialist teaching for dyslexic children in Gwynedd schools.
Figures show three times as many boys as girls are dyslexic.
People with this problem are often labelled dyslexic whereas they are dysgraphic - they have difficulty matching the visual representation of a letter from with their hand movements.
Participants: - NGOs and dyslexics from ASEAN, Australia, China, Hawaii, India, Russia - Representatives from countries in the Asia Pacific - Teachers, parents and local educational authorities - Foreign students especially in education from the Asia Pacific - General public
Dyslexia Advantage serves the international "dyslexia community" via its website and blog, organizing conferences and offering online interviews with dyslexic luminaries, such as Henry Winkler of "Happy Days" TV fame, who has co-authored 17 "Hank Zipzer" novels.
Dr Cathy Williams, a paediatric ophthalmologist at Bristol Eye Hospital and lead author, said the results show that "vision problems are rare in dyslexic children," with a similar occurrence in their non-dyslexic classmates.
He said: "It is a vital time for dyslexic children in their last year of primary school because parents need to get the ball rolling to get an education plan in place before their child goes to secondary school.
IT specialist Matt, 35, chairman of GCHQ's dyslexic and dyspraxic support community, said: "People with the neuro-diversity usually have a 'spiky skills' profile which means certain skill areas will be below par and others may be well above.
To investigate the two potential sources, Bart Boets and colleagues from the Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium scanned the brains of 22 normal and 23 dyslexic adults.
When the researchers analysed the overall activity of the brain, the dyslexics were notably different to the non-dyslexics.
The company then approached Michael Morpurgo, who was already working with Barrington Stoke on textbooks that use a limited number of words, to help create the Red Squirrel books, a picture book list that dyslexic parents and less confident readers can read with their children.