dyslexia

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dyslexia

(dĭslĕk`sēə), in psychology, a developmental disability in reading or spelling, generally becoming evident in early schooling. To a dyslexic, letters and words may appear reversed, e.g., d seen as b or was seen as saw. Many dyslexics never learn to read or write effectively, although they tend to show above average intelligence in other areas. With the aid of computerized brain scans such as positron emission tomography (PET), recent studies have offered strong evidence that dyslexia is located in the brain. Damage to the brain can cause a reading disability similar to dyslexia, known as acquired dyslexia or alexia.

dyslexia

[dis′lek·sē·ə]
(medicine)
Impairment of the ability to read.

dyslexia

a developmental disorder which can cause learning difficulty in one or more of the areas of reading, writing, and numeracy
References in periodicals archive ?
A DEVOTED mum has won a tribunal against Birmingham City Council to prove her son is dyslexic and needs extra support.
For class feedback at the end of the activity, it allows the tutor to ask for a volunteer from each group to speak, as a tutor should 'not expect dyslexics to answer questions or talk in big groups' (The British Dyslexia Association 2004).
To find out, Sally Shaywitz, a neuroscientist (brain scientist) at Yale University and author of Overcoming Dyslexia, took snapshots of the brains of dyslexics and non-dyslexics with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).
Dyslexics have trouble distinguishing between letters that rhyme, such as B and D.
Dyslexia long perplexed scientists, not least because numerous dyslexics display above-normal levels of intelligence along with their serious reading difficulties.
A 2006 study involving 18 dyslexic children and 21 nondyslexic children in grades 4-6 illustrates the importance of developmentally appropriate remediation in helping dyslexic children become better spellers.
One child in every British classroom is likely to be severely dyslexic.
The 'creative' side of dyslexics' brains are often very well developed and this, coupled with an unconventional approach to structure, has opened opportunities to dyslexics in these areas.
Dyslexics often reverse letters in the words they read or write.
A spokesman for the authority's education department said the centre at Brynteg Comprehensive School offers dyslexic pupils expert guidance from qualified and experienced staff in an environment designed to nurture and encourage them in line with national curriculum objectives.
WHAT: 15 percent of all children struggle to learn reading because they are dyslexic.
I love the stories of dyslexic people who have made great contributions in their chosen fields.