dysphasia


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dysphasia

[dis′fā·zhə]
(medicine)
Partial aphasia due to a brain lesion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first classification of communication disorders included language impairment (children with communication disorders), aphasia, articulation disorders, voice disorders, stuttering, cluttering, and dysphasia.
A focal neurological deficit (hemiparesis, dysphasia, cranial nerve palsies or hemianopia) of sudden onset that persist beyond 24 hours and documented by a brain CT scan indicating the presence of infarction or hemorrhage.
9 The common symptoms and signs in patient with a foreign body that has been retained for less than 24 hours tend to be gastrointestinal and include dysphasia, drooling, vomiting, gagging and anorexia.
Speech and motor deficits improved completely in all patients, except in one patient who had persistent dysphasia at 12 months follow-up.
Other conditions associated with hip pain include bursitis, muscle cramps, hip fracture, stress fractures of the femoral neck or pelvis, avascular necrosis, joint infection, and congenital defects such as congenital dislocation (CDH) and congenital hip dysphasia.
Our members have many different types of disabilities - Down's syndrome, dysphasia, Asperger's syndrome and even loss of limbs," said Eunice Lamb, from the club.
Frankie suffered from a stroke that left him with dysphasia which affected his speech and his memory.
Indications of endoscopy in the patients with chronic dyspepsia included incomplete treatment with antacid drugs, presence of suspicious signs (weight loss, anaemia of undetermined cause, gastrointestinal bleeding, dysphasia, icterus, lymphadenopathy, consistent vomiting and palpable abdominal mass), age over 45 years, history of heartburn for more than 5 years, and being suspicious of cancer or organic diseases.
0) and this was significantly higher in patients with hemiparesis or hemiplegia, dysphasia and alterations in consciousness (p less than 0.
The app is for those with disabilities such as apraxia, dysarthria, dysphasia, and autism, who may suffer from limited fine motor skills or vision problems.
However, later on during the day her ptosis, dysphasia and limb weakness became evident again.