Dyspnea

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dyspnea

[′dis·nē·ə]
(medicine)
Difficult or labored breathing.

Dyspnea

 

disruption of the rate and depth of respiration, accompanied by the sensation of shortness of breath.

Cardiac patients experience dyspnea both while physically exerting themselves and while subsequently resting in the horizontal position. Their condition is complicated by orthopnea, the inability to breathe except in a sitting position. In patients with cardiac diseases, attacks of severe dyspnea, which usually occur at night, are a symptom of cardiac asthma. In such cases, the dyspnea is inspiratory; that is, the patient finds it difficult to inhale. Expiratory dyspnea, difficulty in exhaling, arises when the lumina of the small bronchi and bronchioles are narrowed, as in bronchial asthma. It also arises when the elasticity of the lung tissue is lost, as in chronic emphysema of the lungs. Cerebral dyspnea is a result of direct irritation of the cerebral respiratory center by such abnormalities as tumors and hemorrhages.

References in periodicals archive ?
Respiratory artifact in dyspneic patients can be reduced by hyperventilating the patient prior to the scan acquisition and with the use of supplemental oxygen.
3) Studies show that assays used to quantitatively measure this peptide are quite accurate in differentiating CHF from other dyspneic patients.
Soluble ST2 plasma concentrations predict 1-year mortality in acutely dyspneic emergency department patients with pulmonary disease.
In April 2009, a 2-year-old, spayed female ferret at the ferret rescue and shelter, which had originated from the breeding facility in Canada and passed through the US distribution center, became acutely dyspneic and died within 15 minutes.
Association of atrial fibrillation and amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide concentrations in dyspneic subjects with and without acute heart failure: results from the ProBNP Investigation of Dyspnea in the Emergency Department (PRIDE) study.
Clearly, it's the patient who is most dyspneic and clearly [the benefits are seen] in the first 24 hours.
5) There were 599 dyspneic subjects enrolled in the PRIDE study, of which 209 (35%) had ADHF; this population represented the "before NT-proBNP" cohort of subjects with ADHF.
While receiving her sixth intravenous infusion of Infliximab (3 mg/kg), she became acutely dyspneic and developed mid-sternal chest pressure.
Patients who experienced normal or near-normal respiration postoperatively were regarded as having a successful outcome, patients who were dyspneic on minimal exercise were classified as having an intermediate outcome, and those who could not be decannulated were classified as having an unsuccessful outcome.
The just-published study analyzed a cohort of 346 patients diagnosed with ADHF derived from two previously reported prospective clinical trials of dyspneic emergency department patients.
Despite aggressive diuresis, the patient remained dyspneic and therefore the decision was made to perform diagnostic heart catheterization.
At 7 months after surgery, the bird was severely dyspneic and was euthanatized.