dysrhythmia

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dysrhythmia

[dis′rith·mē·ə]
(medicine)
Disordered rhythm of the brain waves.
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The strict exclusion of patients who already had any history of dysrhythmias and low EF, which has often been omitted in prior studies, was expected to have yielded less ambiguous results.
The shock is attributable to both dysrhythmia as well as dyselectrolytemia (9) Decreased cerebral perfusion explains the giddiness and altered mentation in our patients (10).
Not your regular high: cardiac dysrhythmias caused by loperamide.
14) Factors influencing the occurrence of post-surgical delirium include hematocrit levels of lower than 30%, (12,15) reduced cardiac output, (12,16-18) use of balloon pump, use of inotropic medication, (16) intubation more than 24 hours, need for re-surgery, post-surgical dysrhythmias, infusion of more than 4 units of packed red cells, infusion of more than one unit of fresh frozen plasma, carbon dioxide level of more than 45 mmHg, more than 60 mmHg decrease in the arterial oxygen level, elevated blood sugar, reduced blood sugar, elevated temperature, and increased serum sodium, and urea levels.
Tilton writes that apnea "has significant safety implications because it can cause excessive daytime sleepiness, cognitive impairment, cardiac dysrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, personality disturbances, and hypertension, to cite just a few.
Chronic HF arises from pre-existing cardiac conditions including hypertension, myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathy or heart dysrhythmias.
A basic dysrhythmias review curriculum was written and formatted into modules that consisted of an introduction, program objectives, purpose of project, cardiovascular system, cardiac conduction system, ECG waveform characteristics, approach to ECG interpretation, and recognizing arrhythmias with special considerations for the patient with CKD.
These conditions include hypertension, coronary artery disease, cardiac dysrhythmias, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular accident, renal dysfunction, diabetes, and depression (3).
Symptoms and signs of increased sympathetic activity include hypertension, tachycardia, cardiac dysrhythmias, increased perspiration, fever, hyperglycaemia and restlessness.
Adverse effects include decreases in blood flow to other body organs including the brain, decreased oxygen utilization and lactate clearance in body tissues, increased myocardial oxygen demand, and stimulation of cardiac dysrhythmias.
In addition to the otologic exam for vestibular diseases, patients should be screened for migraine, traumatic brain injury, dysautonomia, and dysrhythmias.