dysthymia


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dysthymia

[‚dis′thī·mē·ə]
(medicine)
Any childhood condition caused by malfunction of the thymus.
(psychology)
A mood disorder characterized by chronic depression for a period of at least 2 years. Also known as depressive neurosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, many employers would rather send an employee with dysthymia to get Prozac instead of paying $120 an hour for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with a psychologist, Harrison says.
1) The following conditions occur commonly with depression: dysthymia, autism spectrum disorders, anxiety, disruptive disorders, ADHD, and substance abuse.
If you suffer from dysthymia, more often than not you feel depressed during most of the day.
Dysregulated or low serotonin pathways within the hypothalamus may underlie a wide variety of eating disorders, with or without concurrent depression or dysthymia.
Even a cursory examination of the descriptions of dysthymia can indicate why rates of it can be high.
Dysthymia that starts later in life is often triggered by a major life stress, such as the loss of a job, the death of a loved one, or the break-up of a marriage.
medical director of the Mood Disorders Module at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and coauthor of Beating the Blues: New Approaches to Overcoming Dysthymia and Chronic Mild Depression.
A person suffering from dysthymia may experience many of the same symptoms that occur in major depression, but they are less intense and last much longer--at least two years.
Five mood disorders (major depressive disorder, bipolar I and bipolar II disorders, dysthymia, and hypomania)
John's Wort compared with placebo in patients with minor depressive symptoms or dysthymia, with the main focus on which diagnostic entities are optimally amenable to treatment with two different doses of Hypericum, and which are not.
Mild depression or, as it's clinically known, dysthymia affects up to 35 million people in the United States, but only a fraction of them seeks treatment.
Of the women included in the study, 82% had major depression, 12% had minor depression, and 6% had dysthymia.