eardrum


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eardrum

[′ir‚drəm]
(anatomy)
References in periodicals archive ?
That was on holidays and I didn't realise what happened until I went in the water again and it's the most painful thing having a hole in your eardrum and having water go in.
The laser light pulses then shine onto a photodetector in the TMT, which converts the light back into electronic signals, transmitting sound vibrations directly to the eardrum by direct contact.
Specialists warn that continuous use of cotton swabs may result in a punctured eardrum or push the earwax further inside trapping it in the ear canal, eventually leading to an ear inflammation.
Mr Bozman added that Ms Balmforth's injuries included a perforated eardrum.
Assembling all of the evidence together, the researchers suggest that the reptiles rely on magnified time difference at the eardrum to locate noises.
Dr Mustafa said that the most common problems in children in UAE are fluid behind the eardrum because of a chronic middle ear infection and accumulation of wax in the external ear canal.
He said that passengers should chew a gum during take-off of an aeroplane as air pressure on the eardrum due to barotrauma results in the rupture of the eardrum and consequent deafness, adding that opening and closing the mouth by chewing is an important tip for the ear care.
Copiphora gorgonensis katydids (one shown) don't need bones for translating because the eardrum does the job.
The middle ear plays an essential role in determining how well we hear - sound waves hit the eardrum which in turn cause vibrations on to the tiny bones in the middle ear.
Physical examination revealed the presence of a central eardrum perforation with cholesteatoma.
A membrane called the eardrum separates the middle and outer ear.
Air trapped in your inner ear is at a higher pressure, so it starts to push outwards on the eardrum.