early binding

early binding

[′ər·lē ¦bīnd·iŋ]
(computer science)
The assignment of data types (such as integer or string) to variables during the compilation of a computer program rather than at run time.

early binding

In programming, the assignment of types to variables and expressions at compilation time. Also called "static binding" and "static typing." Contrast with dynamic binding. See binding time.
References in periodicals archive ?
Only two copies have such complete text and with such an early binding, according to the auction house.
Ask your information security manager if he or she has a position on early binding versus late binding and see how quickly he or she can come up with a cover story.
Second, I should have taken my skis back to the rental shop after the first early binding release and had them readjusted.
0 system are enhancements to security, including the feature of early binding, which adds control to the display of search results.
She advises her readers that early binding manuals need to be used with caution, however, because some of the described practices may have been purely local or were otherwise written by amateurs.
Books should be opened carefully to avoid acute opening, which can cause severe damage to early binding structures, and the page opening should be held down with a strip of polyethylene tape if this does not affect the scanning.
Options for securing some form of early binding agreement, which include conditional contracts, lock-out agreements, options to purchase and cost guarantees, have also been suggested.
early binding," consecutive foliation of texts in an early hand, or "provenance and marginal notes [or other] paratextual marks in an early hand .
By analysing surviving sales records and prices, different kinds of early bindings (and what they imply about the status and use of its contents for that particular owner), this part of the book provides an overview of what is nonetheless knowable.
My own interests center upon the material and technical study of the Western codex form, which goes back to the pioneering studies of early bindings and astute bibliographers such as Pollard, Howard Nixon, and Dorothy Miner, among others, in the mid-twentieth century whose work expanded the investigation from fine bindings into bookbinding in general.