eccentric

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eccentric,

in mechanics, device for changing rotary to back-and-forth motion. A disk is mounted off center on a shaft. One flat, open, circular end of a rod fits around the edge of the disk; the other end is usually attached to a block that slides in a slot. As the shaft rotates the block slides back and forth, carrying along whatever is attached to it, e.g., a valve. The distance between the center of the shaft and the center of the disk is the eccentricity. The so-called throw may mean either the eccentricity or the distance the block moves, which is twice the eccentricity. Camscam,
mechanical device for converting a rotating motion into a reciprocating, or back-and-forth, motion, or for changing a simple motion into a complex one. A simple form of cam is a circular disk set eccentrically on a shaft in order to induce (when the shaft rotates) a rising
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 and crankscrank,
mechanical linkage consisting of a bar attached to a pivot at one of its ends in such a way that it is capable of rotating through a complete circle about the pivot.
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 perform the same function as the eccentric, which designers often prefer to the crank for short motions.

Eccentric

Not having the same center or center line; departing or deviating from the conventional or established norm.

Eccentric

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

In astronomy, eccentricity refers to an elliptical orbit, specifically to the extent to which the ellipse described by a celestial body’s orbit departs from a perfect circle, expressed by the ratio of the major to the minor axis.

Eccentric

 

in astronomy, an auxiliary circle in the geocentric system of the world, introduced by Hipparchus to represent the annual revolution of the sun around the earth through motion along a circle with constant angular velocity. The nonuniformity of the sun’s motion along the ecliptic was attributed to the fact

Figure 1

that the sun moved (uniformly) along the circumference of an eccentric, whose center C did not coincide with the earth T (see Figure 1).


Eccentric

 

a circular disk whose axis of rotation does not coincide with its geometric center. In cam mechanisms, an eccentric, acting upon a rod that moves in a straight line, communicates to the rod a harmonic motion such that the displacement of the rod is proportional to the cosine (or sine) of the eccentric’s rotation angle. In linkage, an eccentric acts as a crank, that is, as a link that makes a complete revolution around its axis of rotation. Such an application of an eccentric is efficient when the crank (its throw equal to the eccentricity of an eccentric) must be very short. Eccentrics are also used in lathe attachments to clamp details that are being machined.

eccentric

[ek′sen·trik]
(science and technology)
Situated to one side with reference to a center.

eccentric

eccentric head and shaft
Not having the same center or center line.

eccentric

1. situated away from the centre or the axis
2. not having a common centre
3. a device for converting rotary motion to reciprocating motion
References in periodicals archive ?
SHERMAN OAKS - For half a century, a tower of 2,000 wooden pallets has stood out as oddball artwork, an ode to the eccentric and an official San Fernando Valley monument that's frustrated would-be developers and won the admiration of city cultural guardians.
Vocal students from the UCE Birmingham Conservatoire are to perform Malcolm Williamson's English Eccentrics at the city's Crescent Theatre, from March 9-11.
How are we going to cultivate our future eccentrics when the pressure to conform is so great?
The comedian made two documentary series in the 1970s: In Search of the Great Eccentric and Eccentrics At Play.
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Psychologist David Weeks has conducted and reported, with writer Jamie James, the only systematic study of eccentric people known to me: "Eccentrics: A Study of Sanity and Strangeness" (New York: Villard Books, 1995).
John Murray England is famous throughout the world for its eccentrics.
He considers eccentrics to be those few men and women who see the world in a different way to the majority and who then act on their convictions without caring what the rest of society thinks.
Who are the eccentrics of yesteryear that you love so?
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It's unlikely, though, that any of us will find ourselves in a show devoted to eccentrics which is coming to the Customs House in South Shields next Friday.
But Birmingham, perhaps more than most places, needs its eccentrics.