ecclesiastical

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ecclesiastical

of or relating to the Christian Church
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144) By expressing the church's intent to be ecclesiastically subject to PCUSA, the court determined that Gashland's charter intended for all non-doctrinal decisions to be reserved for the congregation.
There is hope for the future, theologically and ecclesiastically.
arrest and bring to Newgate gaol all felons and evildoers notoriously suspected of coming nightly out of places ecclesiastically privileged, assembling in the city and suburbs to commit divers felonies, robberies, thefts, murders, etc.
American evangelicalism is characterized ecclesiastically by its tendency (emerging out of its giving priority to individual faith over corporate religious practice) to circulate primarily in non-denominational and para-church organizations and doctrinally by its adherents' emphasis on individual conversion, the authority of scripture, crucicentrism, the centrality of evangelical witness, and the recognition that "the real, historical character of God's saving work recorded in Scripture" informs each individual's attempt to live a "spiritually transformed life" (Marsden, ix-x).
From finding the information to creating a comprehensive bibliography, Lenburg gives readers all the information they need to use the internet well, making "Guide to Research" an invaluable and ecclesiastically recommended resource.
Almost ecclesiastically poised, these vessels anticipate a narrative incident that eventually happens: The glasses--all four at once--explode, providing the only sound and the only motion of the ninety-second work.
My sister walks the familiar tightrope of the modern household marked by "disparity of cult," as the Catholic/ non-Catholic marriage is ecclesiastically described.
We asked them to respect any ecclesiastically privileged information they may have had about us, and to not defame us to the congregation.
Yemen had no significant diplomatic relations with the west, and it was situated ecclesiastically and politically between the Axumite kingdom of Ethiopia and the east Roman emperor in Constantinople.
This mix of ideals, clearly idiosyncratic in the postwar political and cultural climate, has attracted an eclectic, but not an ecclesiastically or politically coherent, following.
Headley argues that in a religiously penetrated and ecclesiastically constructed society, religious dissent was the only type to prove effective.
OVER the past 200 years, Wythall has been bounced, administratively and ecclesiastically, between Bromsgrove, Kings Norton and Alvechurch.