ecclesiastic

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ecclesiastic

1. a clergyman or other person in holy orders
2. of or associated with the Christian Church or clergy
References in periodicals archive ?
Few scholars possess as intimate a knowledge of the careers and worldly ambitions of Renaissance ecclesiastics as D.
To my fellow Canadians who have created a rift that goes far beyond ecclesiastics and dogma and has turned citizen against citizen and family member against family member, I bring news that is heretical in nature: the world is not flat and revolves around the sun.
lt;/p> <pre> In many cases, the ecclesiastics whom we have interviewed have no awareness of the depth of their distancing from practical economic dilemmas, or of the reasons for the church's inability to be a significant influence on the business culture.
There are ecclesiastics and lay folks in several religious traditions, as well as professional mediators and arbitrators, who privately could repair this present AFL-CIO split.
While aristocrats respected some rules of the Church--avoiding very close relatives, those already married and ecclesiastics, consent by the bride and groom before a priest was much less important than the earlier arrangements of the parents, who assumed that the daughter, in particular, would be an obedient and submissive bride.
For him, religion and its ecclesiastics were at the top of the hit list: 'No longer do I allow myself to see religion as anything but a brutal insignia of a slow moral decomposition', he once wrote.
But senior Church of Wales ecclesiastics still have concerns over the future of the church.
6 gave the common law courts jurisdiction over acts of sodomy, and explicitly denied "benefit of clergy," the immunity ecclesiastics had traditionally enjoyed from punishment by royal officials.
This character was revealed above all in the systematic attacks on the Catholic clergy with which the followers of Hitler and [General Erich von] Ludendorff, especially in street speeches, stirred up the population, thus exposing the ecclesiastics to insults and abuse.
Shaw's account ecclesiastics rather seem to be the exception.
Visiting Cannes, Nice and Monaco, they arrived in San Remo, where Mitford writes: "The place is full of black-cassocked ecclesiastics, Britishers and Yankee Doodles in their chimney pot hats.
Other ecclesiastics are also deprived of their freedom and subject to undue pressures and limitations in their pastoral activities.