echinacea


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Related to echinacea: goldenseal, Echinacea angustifolia

echinacea

(ĕk'ənā`shēə), popular herbal remedy, or botanical, believed to benefit the immune system. It is used especially to alleviate common colds and the flu. Several controlled studies using it as a cold medicine have failed to find any benefit from its use, but a 2007 review of 14 different studies said that echinacea could have modest to marked effects against cold viruses. Echinacea is extracted from the roots and flowering tops of the purple coneflowerconeflower,
name for several American wildflowers of the family Asteraceae (aster family). The purple coneflowers (genus Echinacea), found E of the Rockies, have purple to pinkish petallike rays; some cultivated forms have white flowers.
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 (Echinacea angustifolia and E. purpurea).
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echinacea

echinacea

The famous immune system stimulant that’s touted as a healing wonder, used for everything from herpes to brown recluse spider bites. Great for colds, flu and anything your body may be fighting. Increases levels of virus-fighting interferon in the body. Prompts the thymus, bone marrow, and spleen to produce more immune cells. Helps cleanse the blood and boost lymph system cleansing making it a powerful detoxifier for removing infection organisms. Used on hard-to-heal wounds, even sun-damaged skin. Cortisone-like activity. Increases levels of virus-fighting interferon in the body. Not recommended for people with HIV or AIDS. The flower has a brown spiky seed ball with long thin pinkish purple petals around it. The whole plant is edible. Most of the power is in the root, but you can use the flower and seeds by crushing and drying them and making tea. Fresh flower petals make salads and desserts look beautiful. The seeds can be ground into a powder and used as a black pepper type spice. The seeds can also be sprouted and eaten as echinacea sprouts.(good winter food)

Echinacea

 

(purple coneflower), a genus of perennial herbaceous plants of the family Compositae. The stems reach 1–1.5 m in height, and the inflorescences are large heads. The ray flowers are purple, crimson, or, less commonly, whitish; the disk flowers are blackish purple. There are about five species, distributed in North America. The plants have bactericidal properties and are ornamentals. E. purpurea and E. angustifolia are cultivated. Sometimes the Echinacea are included in the genus Rudbeckia.

Echinacea

[‚ek·ə′nā·shə]
(invertebrate zoology)
A suborder of echinoderms in the order Euechinoidea; individuals have a rigid test, keeled teeth, and branchial slits.
References in periodicals archive ?
If red does not fit in your landscape's color scheme, Echinacea purpurea Green Jewel features soft green petals around dark green cones on plants that grow up to 24 inches tall and 18 inches wide.
Of these, use of echinacea during pregnancy by women were characterised by high age and delivery before 2002, and reduced likelihood of smoking.
This study focuses on determining the mode of action of Echinacea as an antifungal and the role of the alkamides, if any, in Echinacea's antifungal activity.
There's still a lot of the winter to go, but if I keep taking Echinacea, I'm confident I'll see it through with fewer colds.
The Safety of Herbal Medicinal Products Derived from Echinacea Species: A Systematic Review," Drug Safety 28, 387-400(2005).
Interestingly, though, a 2010 study of 719 participants in Wisconsin focusing on illness duration and severity found that the duration of the common cold could be shortened by taking a pill of some sort, whether Echinacea or a placebo with no active ingredients.
Certain Echinacea species are known to have potent antimicrobial, immune supportive and anti-inflammatory properties.
Key Words: Inquiry; dichotomous key; pollen; Echinacea angustifolia.
A new trial aimed to clear up this uncertainty by randomising 719 people with a common cold to one of four arms - two blinded groups (placebo pills or echinacea pills) and two open label groups (no pills or echinacea pills).
Working with a team in Jonathan Wendel's lab at Iowa State University, Widrlechner selected 40 diverse Echinacea populations for DNA analysis from the many populations conserved at the NCRPIS.
The effect of Echinacea purpurea, Astragalus membranaceus and Glycyrrhiza glabra on CD69 expression and immune cell activation in humans.
The studies varied in dosage, duration and the specific variety of Echinacea used, however, so knowing exactly what to take is hard to pinpoint.