echinacea

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Related to echinaceas: Purple coneflower

echinacea

(ĕk'ənā`shēə), popular herbal remedy, or botanical, believed to benefit the immune system. It is used especially to alleviate common colds and the flu. Several controlled studies using it as a cold medicine have failed to find any benefit from its use, but a 2007 review of 14 different studies said that echinacea could have modest to marked effects against cold viruses. Echinacea is extracted from the roots and flowering tops of the purple coneflowerconeflower,
name for several American wildflowers of the family Asteraceae (aster family). The purple coneflowers (genus Echinacea), found E of the Rockies, have purple to pinkish petallike rays; some cultivated forms have white flowers.
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 (Echinacea angustifolia and E. purpurea).
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echinacea

echinacea

The famous immune system stimulant that’s touted as a healing wonder, used for everything from herpes to brown recluse spider bites. Great for colds, flu and anything your body may be fighting. Increases levels of virus-fighting interferon in the body. Prompts the thymus, bone marrow, and spleen to produce more immune cells. Helps cleanse the blood and boost lymph system cleansing making it a powerful detoxifier for removing infection organisms. Used on hard-to-heal wounds, even sun-damaged skin. Cortisone-like activity. Increases levels of virus-fighting interferon in the body. Not recommended for people with HIV or AIDS. The flower has a brown spiky seed ball with long thin pinkish purple petals around it. The whole plant is edible. Most of the power is in the root, but you can use the flower and seeds by crushing and drying them and making tea. Fresh flower petals make salads and desserts look beautiful. The seeds can be ground into a powder and used as a black pepper type spice. The seeds can also be sprouted and eaten as echinacea sprouts.(good winter food)

Echinacea

 

(purple coneflower), a genus of perennial herbaceous plants of the family Compositae. The stems reach 1–1.5 m in height, and the inflorescences are large heads. The ray flowers are purple, crimson, or, less commonly, whitish; the disk flowers are blackish purple. There are about five species, distributed in North America. The plants have bactericidal properties and are ornamentals. E. purpurea and E. angustifolia are cultivated. Sometimes the Echinacea are included in the genus Rudbeckia.

Echinacea

[‚ek·ə′nā·shə]
(invertebrate zoology)
A suborder of echinoderms in the order Euechinoidea; individuals have a rigid test, keeled teeth, and branchial slits.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many modern varieties have been devel-oped from the best known species, Echinacea purpurea, and while they were once generally single flowered, there are now several double flowered forms available.
One such is Echinacea Pink Double Delight, which produces plenty of bright pink heads with a fringe of outer petals.
UNTIL a few years ago echinacea were generally purple, mauve-pink and white, but that has changed now that more varieties are available and growers have had time to build up supply.
A number of recent studies have shown that some echinacea products are not as effective as they purport, however others have been used effectively for years and are supported by numerous studies - so which product should we choose to protect our families this winter?